Health and performance of young dairy calves vaccinated with a modified-live Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida vaccine

Pascale Aubry Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Lorin D. Warnick Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Chuck L. Guard Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Bruce W. Hill Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
Present address is Feedlot Health Management Services, Bay 7—87 Elizabeth St, Okotoks, AB T0L 1T0, Canada.

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Michael F. Witt Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
Present address is Lindwood Veterinary Service, 3860 Manser Rd, Linwood, ON, Canada N0B 2A0.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the health and performance of young dairy calves vaccinated with a commercial Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida vaccine.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—358 Holstein dairy calves between 14 and 20 days of age on 8 farms.

Procedure—Calves were randomly assigned to a control or vaccinated group. The vaccine used was a commercial modified-live M haemolytica and P multocida vaccine that was administered on days 0 and 14. Calf weight was measured on day 0 and monthly for 3 months. Farmers were asked to record any treatment given to the calves and the reason for treatment during the 4 months of the study. Blood was collected from all calves on days 0 and 28, and titers of antibodies to M haemolyticawere determined by means of direct bacterial agglutination.

Results—Mean daily gain was not significantly different between vaccinated and control calves. Vaccinated calves had a significantly greater increase in antibody titers (5.3-fold increase), compared with control calves (3.6-fold increase). There was no significant difference between vaccinated and control calves for any of the treatment outcomes (number and duration of treatments and age at first and last treatments).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the M haemolytica and P multocidavaccine, given twice 2 weeks apart, was effective in increasing titers of antibodies against M haemolytica in young dairy calves but did not improve calf performance or health. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1739–1742)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the health and performance of young dairy calves vaccinated with a commercial Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida vaccine.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—358 Holstein dairy calves between 14 and 20 days of age on 8 farms.

Procedure—Calves were randomly assigned to a control or vaccinated group. The vaccine used was a commercial modified-live M haemolytica and P multocida vaccine that was administered on days 0 and 14. Calf weight was measured on day 0 and monthly for 3 months. Farmers were asked to record any treatment given to the calves and the reason for treatment during the 4 months of the study. Blood was collected from all calves on days 0 and 28, and titers of antibodies to M haemolyticawere determined by means of direct bacterial agglutination.

Results—Mean daily gain was not significantly different between vaccinated and control calves. Vaccinated calves had a significantly greater increase in antibody titers (5.3-fold increase), compared with control calves (3.6-fold increase). There was no significant difference between vaccinated and control calves for any of the treatment outcomes (number and duration of treatments and age at first and last treatments).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the M haemolytica and P multocidavaccine, given twice 2 weeks apart, was effective in increasing titers of antibodies against M haemolytica in young dairy calves but did not improve calf performance or health. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1739–1742)

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