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Complications of enteroplication for the prevention of intussusception recurrence in dogs: 35 cases (1989–1999)

Aric A. Applewhite DVM1,2, Julia C. Hawthorne DVM3,4, and Karen K. Cornell DVM, PhD, DACVS5
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Present address is Veterinary Surgical Group of the Southwest, PC, 12855 Gulf Freeway, Houston, TX 77034.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 4 Present address is Veterinary Referral and Critical Care, 1596 Hockett Rd, Manakin-Sabot, VA 23103.
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

Objective—To compare complication and recurrence rates in dogs treated for intussusception that underwent enteroplication to rates in dogs treated for intussusception that did not undergo enteroplication.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—35 dogs with intestinal intussusception.

Procedure—Information on signalment, clinical signs, potential predisposing causes, surgical technique, opioid administration, use of enteroplication, postoperative complications, and whether the intussusception recurred was obtained from the medical records.

Results—Dogs ranged from 8 weeks to 10 years old. Opioids were administered in the perioperative period in 34 dogs. Enteroplication was performed in 16 dogs. Complications of enteroplication that required a second surgery were identified in 3 dogs. None of the 16 dogs that underwent enteroplication had a recurrence of intussusception, whereas 1 of the 19 dogs that did not undergo enteroplication had a recurrence. Rate of intussusception recurrence and likelihood that a second surgical procedure would be required were not significantly different between dogs that underwent enteroplication and dogs that did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that enteroplication may be associated with lifethreatening complications in dogs, but the likelihood of a dog requiring a second surgical procedure following surgical correction of intussusception was not different between dogs that underwent enteroplication at the time of the initial surgery and dogs that did not. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1415–1418)

Abstract

Objective—To compare complication and recurrence rates in dogs treated for intussusception that underwent enteroplication to rates in dogs treated for intussusception that did not undergo enteroplication.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—35 dogs with intestinal intussusception.

Procedure—Information on signalment, clinical signs, potential predisposing causes, surgical technique, opioid administration, use of enteroplication, postoperative complications, and whether the intussusception recurred was obtained from the medical records.

Results—Dogs ranged from 8 weeks to 10 years old. Opioids were administered in the perioperative period in 34 dogs. Enteroplication was performed in 16 dogs. Complications of enteroplication that required a second surgery were identified in 3 dogs. None of the 16 dogs that underwent enteroplication had a recurrence of intussusception, whereas 1 of the 19 dogs that did not undergo enteroplication had a recurrence. Rate of intussusception recurrence and likelihood that a second surgical procedure would be required were not significantly different between dogs that underwent enteroplication and dogs that did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that enteroplication may be associated with lifethreatening complications in dogs, but the likelihood of a dog requiring a second surgical procedure following surgical correction of intussusception was not different between dogs that underwent enteroplication at the time of the initial surgery and dogs that did not. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1415–1418)