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Evaluation of selected-protein-source diets for management of dogs with adverse reactions to foods

Mieke H. G. LeistraDepartment of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, 3584CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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Peter J. MarkwellWaltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, Waltham-on-the-Wolds, Melton Mowbray, LE14 4RT, UK.

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Ton WillemseDepartment of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, 3584CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate 3 commercially available selected-protein-source diets as maintenance diets in dogs with pruritus caused by adverse food reactions.

Design—Randomized crossover trial.

Animals—40 dogs > 6 months of age with pruritus caused by adverse reactions to foods.

Procedure—Diagnosis was confirmed by use of diet elimination and provocation studies. Subsequently, dogs were fed 3 commercial diets for 3 weeks each in a randomized, blinded, crossover trial. Dogs were evaluated for pruritus, vomiting, diarrhea, and flatulence.

Results—Pruritus recurred in 52.5% of dogs fed a chicken-rice diet, 47.5% of dogs fed a catfish-rice diet, and 85% of dogs fed a venison-rice diet. Overall, 95% of the dogs could be managed successfully with at least 1 of the 3 diets.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that commercially available limited-allergen diets with selected protein sources may be appropriate for long-term management of pruritus caused by adverse food reactions. Testing of various protein sources is usually required. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1411–1414)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate 3 commercially available selected-protein-source diets as maintenance diets in dogs with pruritus caused by adverse food reactions.

Design—Randomized crossover trial.

Animals—40 dogs > 6 months of age with pruritus caused by adverse reactions to foods.

Procedure—Diagnosis was confirmed by use of diet elimination and provocation studies. Subsequently, dogs were fed 3 commercial diets for 3 weeks each in a randomized, blinded, crossover trial. Dogs were evaluated for pruritus, vomiting, diarrhea, and flatulence.

Results—Pruritus recurred in 52.5% of dogs fed a chicken-rice diet, 47.5% of dogs fed a catfish-rice diet, and 85% of dogs fed a venison-rice diet. Overall, 95% of the dogs could be managed successfully with at least 1 of the 3 diets.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that commercially available limited-allergen diets with selected protein sources may be appropriate for long-term management of pruritus caused by adverse food reactions. Testing of various protein sources is usually required. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1411–1414)