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Age distributions of horses with strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma or in the epiploic foramen: 46 cases (1994-2000)

David E. Freeman MVB, PhD, DACVS1 and David J. Schaeffer PhD2
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

Abstract

Objective—To test the hypothesis that strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma or in the epiploic foramen is more common in older horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—46 horses.

Procedure—Ages of horses with strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma (n = 29) or in the epiploic foramen (17) were compared with ages of 79 horses with miscellaneous small intestinal lesions. Effects of increasing age on risk of the diseases of interest were examined by use of logistic regression and a 1-sided trend test for binomial proportions.

Results—Mean age of the horses with strangulation in the epiploic foramen (9.6 years) was the same as that for the horses with miscellaneous small intestinal lesions (7.7), but mean age of the horses with strangulation by a lipoma (19.2) was significantly greater than that for the other groups. The proportion of horses with lipoma increased significantly with increasing age, but the proportion with strangulation in the epiploic foramen did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results refute the current suggestion that increasing age predisposes horses for strangulation of the small intestine in the epiploic foramen but support the suggestion that the risk of strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma increases with age. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:87–89)

Abstract

Objective—To test the hypothesis that strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma or in the epiploic foramen is more common in older horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—46 horses.

Procedure—Ages of horses with strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma (n = 29) or in the epiploic foramen (17) were compared with ages of 79 horses with miscellaneous small intestinal lesions. Effects of increasing age on risk of the diseases of interest were examined by use of logistic regression and a 1-sided trend test for binomial proportions.

Results—Mean age of the horses with strangulation in the epiploic foramen (9.6 years) was the same as that for the horses with miscellaneous small intestinal lesions (7.7), but mean age of the horses with strangulation by a lipoma (19.2) was significantly greater than that for the other groups. The proportion of horses with lipoma increased significantly with increasing age, but the proportion with strangulation in the epiploic foramen did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results refute the current suggestion that increasing age predisposes horses for strangulation of the small intestine in the epiploic foramen but support the suggestion that the risk of strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma increases with age. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:87–89)