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Treatment with a combination of doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation versus surgery and radiation alone for cats with vaccine-associated sarcomas: 25 cases (1995–2000)

Victoria S. Bregazzi DVM, MS, DACVIM1,2, Susan M. LaRue PhD, DACVS, DACVR3, Elizabeth McNiel DVM, MS, DACVIM4, Dennis W. Macy DVM, MS, DACVIM5, William S. Dernell DVM, DACVS6, Barbara E. Powers DVM, PhD, DACVP7, and Stephen J. Withrow DVM, DACVIM, DACVS8
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 2 Present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 3 Department of Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 4 Department of Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 6 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 7 Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 8 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Abstract

Objective—To compare use of doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation versus surgery and radiation alone for treatment of cats with vaccine-associated sarcoma.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—25 cats with vaccine-associated sarcomas.

Procedure—Time to first recurrence and survival time were compared between the 2 treatment groups. The number of surgeries (1 or > 1) were compared with respect to time to first recurrence and survival time.

Results—Median time to first recurrence was 661 days for the group that received doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation. Median time to first recurrence has not yet been attained for the group treated with surgery and radiation alone. Median survival time was 674 days for the group treated with doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation and 842 days for the group treated with surgery and radiation alone. For time to first recurrence and survival time, significant differences were not detected between cats that had 1 surgery and those that had > 1 surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Significant differences between the 2 treatment groups were not detected. The efficacy of doxorubicin in the treatment of vaccine-associated sarcomas is uncertain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:547–550)

Abstract

Objective—To compare use of doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation versus surgery and radiation alone for treatment of cats with vaccine-associated sarcoma.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—25 cats with vaccine-associated sarcomas.

Procedure—Time to first recurrence and survival time were compared between the 2 treatment groups. The number of surgeries (1 or > 1) were compared with respect to time to first recurrence and survival time.

Results—Median time to first recurrence was 661 days for the group that received doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation. Median time to first recurrence has not yet been attained for the group treated with surgery and radiation alone. Median survival time was 674 days for the group treated with doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation and 842 days for the group treated with surgery and radiation alone. For time to first recurrence and survival time, significant differences were not detected between cats that had 1 surgery and those that had > 1 surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Significant differences between the 2 treatment groups were not detected. The efficacy of doxorubicin in the treatment of vaccine-associated sarcomas is uncertain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:547–550)