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Results of magnetic resonance imaging in dogs with vestibular disorders: 85 cases (1996–1999)

Laurent S. Garosi DVM1, Ruth Dennis MA, VetMB2, Jacques Penderis BVSc, MVM3, Christopher R. Lamb MA, VetMB, DACVR4, Mike P. Targett VetMB, PhD5, Rodolfo Cappello DVM6, and Agnes J. Delauche DVM, DACVIM7
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  • 1 Centre for Small Animal Studies, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Suffolk, CB8 7UU, England.
  • | 2 Centre for Small Animal Studies, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Suffolk, CB8 7UU, England.
  • | 3 Centre for Small Animal Studies, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Suffolk, CB8 7UU, England.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, England.
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, England.
  • | 6 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, England.
  • | 7 Novartis Animal Health UK Ltd, Whittlesford, Cambridge, CB2 4XW, England.

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in dogs with vestibular disorders (VD) and correlate results of MR imaging with clinical findings.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—85 dogs.

Procedure—Information on signalment, clinical signs, and presumptive lesion location was obtained from the medical records, and MR images were reviewed.

Results—27 dogs had peripheral VD, 37 had central VD, and 21 had paradoxical VD. Of the 27 dogs with peripheral VD, 11 (41%) had MR imaging abnormalities involving the ipsilateral tympanic bulla compatible with otitis media (6 also had abnormalities involving the petrous portion of the ipsilateral temporal bone compatible with otitis interna), 7 (26%) had MR imaging abnormalities compatible with middle ear neoplasia, 2 (7%) had an ipsilateral cerebellopontine angle lesion, and 7 (26%) did not have MR imaging abnormalities. All dogs with central and paradoxical VD had abnormalities evident on MR images. Of the 37 dogs with central VD, 13 (35%) had an extra-axial lesion, 6 (16%) had an intra-axial lesion, and 18 (49%) had multiple intra-axial lesions. In 23 (62%) dogs with central VD, lesions on MR images corresponded with location suspected on the basis of clinical signs. Of the 21 dogs with paradoxical VD, 12 (57%) had an extra-axial lesion, 5 (24%) had an intra-axial lesion, and 4 (19%) had multiple intra-axial lesions. Location of lesions on MR images agreed with location suspected on the basis of clinical signs in 19 (90%) dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that MR imaging may be helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of VD in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:385–391)

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in dogs with vestibular disorders (VD) and correlate results of MR imaging with clinical findings.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—85 dogs.

Procedure—Information on signalment, clinical signs, and presumptive lesion location was obtained from the medical records, and MR images were reviewed.

Results—27 dogs had peripheral VD, 37 had central VD, and 21 had paradoxical VD. Of the 27 dogs with peripheral VD, 11 (41%) had MR imaging abnormalities involving the ipsilateral tympanic bulla compatible with otitis media (6 also had abnormalities involving the petrous portion of the ipsilateral temporal bone compatible with otitis interna), 7 (26%) had MR imaging abnormalities compatible with middle ear neoplasia, 2 (7%) had an ipsilateral cerebellopontine angle lesion, and 7 (26%) did not have MR imaging abnormalities. All dogs with central and paradoxical VD had abnormalities evident on MR images. Of the 37 dogs with central VD, 13 (35%) had an extra-axial lesion, 6 (16%) had an intra-axial lesion, and 18 (49%) had multiple intra-axial lesions. In 23 (62%) dogs with central VD, lesions on MR images corresponded with location suspected on the basis of clinical signs. Of the 21 dogs with paradoxical VD, 12 (57%) had an extra-axial lesion, 5 (24%) had an intra-axial lesion, and 4 (19%) had multiple intra-axial lesions. Location of lesions on MR images agreed with location suspected on the basis of clinical signs in 19 (90%) dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that MR imaging may be helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of VD in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:385–391)