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Survival rates for horses undergoing stapled small intestinal anastomosis: 84 cases (1988–1997)

Michael N. FugaroVeterinary Teaching Hospital, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
Present address is the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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Nathalie M. CotéVeterinary Teaching Hospital, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.

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 DVM, DVSc, DACVS

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether location and type of small intestinal anastomosis and other variables were associated with short- and long-term survival rates in horses undergoing stapled small intestinal anastomosis.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—84 horses that underwent small intestinal anastomosis.

Procedure—Medical records from 1988 to 1997 were examined for horses that underwent stapled small intestinal anastomosis. Horses were allotted into 4 groups: jejunojejunostomy (n = 27), jejunoileostomy (11), jejunoileocecostomy with small intestinal resection (20), and jejunoileocecostomy without small intestinal resection (26). Survival rates and other variables were determined.

Results—Horses that underwent jejunoileocecostomy without resection had a significantly higher survival rate at all intervals than did horses in the other 3 groups. At 180 and 365 days after surgery, horses that underwent jejunojejunostomy had a significantly lower survival rate than those that underwent jejunoileocecostomy with intestinal resection. Horses that underwent jejunoileocecostomy with intestinal resection had a significantly higher survival rate at 1 year, compared with the combined jejunojejunostomy and jejunoileostomy groups. Preoperative heart rate was inversely associated with survival rate. Overall survival rates at discharge and 1 year were 81 and 56%, respectively. For horses that underwent small intestinal resection, survival rates at discharge and 1 year were 65 and 47%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Horses that underwent anastomosis of the small intestine to the cecum without resection had the highest survival rate, compared with horses that required intestinal resection. In some instances, resection and anastomosis involving the cecum had better prognosis than resections involving 2 segments of the small intestine. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1603–1607)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether location and type of small intestinal anastomosis and other variables were associated with short- and long-term survival rates in horses undergoing stapled small intestinal anastomosis.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—84 horses that underwent small intestinal anastomosis.

Procedure—Medical records from 1988 to 1997 were examined for horses that underwent stapled small intestinal anastomosis. Horses were allotted into 4 groups: jejunojejunostomy (n = 27), jejunoileostomy (11), jejunoileocecostomy with small intestinal resection (20), and jejunoileocecostomy without small intestinal resection (26). Survival rates and other variables were determined.

Results—Horses that underwent jejunoileocecostomy without resection had a significantly higher survival rate at all intervals than did horses in the other 3 groups. At 180 and 365 days after surgery, horses that underwent jejunojejunostomy had a significantly lower survival rate than those that underwent jejunoileocecostomy with intestinal resection. Horses that underwent jejunoileocecostomy with intestinal resection had a significantly higher survival rate at 1 year, compared with the combined jejunojejunostomy and jejunoileostomy groups. Preoperative heart rate was inversely associated with survival rate. Overall survival rates at discharge and 1 year were 81 and 56%, respectively. For horses that underwent small intestinal resection, survival rates at discharge and 1 year were 65 and 47%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Horses that underwent anastomosis of the small intestine to the cecum without resection had the highest survival rate, compared with horses that required intestinal resection. In some instances, resection and anastomosis involving the cecum had better prognosis than resections involving 2 segments of the small intestine. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1603–1607)