Effect of a bioflavonoid dietary supplement on acetaminophen-induced oxidative injury to feline erythrocytes

Robin W. Allison DVM1, E. Duane Lassen DVM, PhD, DACVP2, Mary Jo Burkhard DVM, PhD, DACVP3,4, and Michael R. Lappin DVM, PhD, DACVIM5
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  • 1 Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1671.
  • | 2 Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1671.
  • | 3 Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1671.
  • | 4 Present address is Department of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1671.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of a commercial bioflavonoid antioxidant on acetaminophen-induced oxidative injury to feline erythrocytes.

Design—Randomized controlled study.

Animals—45 healthy age-matched cats.

Procedure—Cats were assigned to 3 experimental groups. Groups 1 and 3 received a bioflavonoid antioxidant (10 mg/d) orally for 2 weeks. Groups 2 and 3 received an oxidative challenge with acetaminophen (90 mg/kg [41 mg/lb] of body weight, PO) on day 7. Packed cell volume, percentage of erythrocytes with Heinz bodies, blood methemoglobin concentration, and blood reduced and oxidized glutathione concentrations were determined at various times during the 2-week study period.

Results—Adverse effects were not associated with bioflavonoid antioxidant administration alone. Acetaminophen administration resulted in a significant increase in methemoglobin concentration in groups 2 and 3; differences were not detected between these groups. Heinz body concentrations in groups 2 and 3 increased after acetaminophen administration; however, the increase in cats that received the antioxidant was significantly less than in group-2 cats. Total blood glutathione concentrations did not change significantly in groups 2 and 3 after acetaminophen administration; however, ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione concentration increased significantly after administration in group-2 cats, compared with group-3 cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Oral administration of bioflavonoid antioxidants to cats at risk for oxidative stress may have a beneficial effect on their ability to resist oxidative injury to erythrocytes. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1157–1161)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of a commercial bioflavonoid antioxidant on acetaminophen-induced oxidative injury to feline erythrocytes.

Design—Randomized controlled study.

Animals—45 healthy age-matched cats.

Procedure—Cats were assigned to 3 experimental groups. Groups 1 and 3 received a bioflavonoid antioxidant (10 mg/d) orally for 2 weeks. Groups 2 and 3 received an oxidative challenge with acetaminophen (90 mg/kg [41 mg/lb] of body weight, PO) on day 7. Packed cell volume, percentage of erythrocytes with Heinz bodies, blood methemoglobin concentration, and blood reduced and oxidized glutathione concentrations were determined at various times during the 2-week study period.

Results—Adverse effects were not associated with bioflavonoid antioxidant administration alone. Acetaminophen administration resulted in a significant increase in methemoglobin concentration in groups 2 and 3; differences were not detected between these groups. Heinz body concentrations in groups 2 and 3 increased after acetaminophen administration; however, the increase in cats that received the antioxidant was significantly less than in group-2 cats. Total blood glutathione concentrations did not change significantly in groups 2 and 3 after acetaminophen administration; however, ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione concentration increased significantly after administration in group-2 cats, compared with group-3 cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Oral administration of bioflavonoid antioxidants to cats at risk for oxidative stress may have a beneficial effect on their ability to resist oxidative injury to erythrocytes. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1157–1161)