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Pulmonary function, ventilator management, and outcome of dogs with thoracic trauma and pulmonary contusions: 10 cases (1994–1998)

Vicki L. Campbell DVM1 and Lesley G. King MVB, DACVECC, DACVIM2
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  • 1 Section of Critical Care, Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 2 Section of Critical Care, Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Abstract

Objective—To document pulmonary function, ventilator management, and outcome of dogs with thoracic trauma that required mechanical ventilation because of severe pulmonary contusions.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—10 dogs that required mechanical ventilation because of severe pulmonary contusions caused by blunt thoracic trauma.

Procedure—Signalment, historical data, arterial blood gas values, oxygen tension-based indices, ventilator settings, peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, tidal volume, and minute ventilation values were retrieved from medical records.

Results—All 10 dogs required positive-pressure ventilation because of dyspnea following trauma and had severely abnormal pulmonary function. Survival rate to discharge was 30%. Dogs were categorized into 2 groups; group A included 5 dogs in which pulmonary function improved during ventilation, whereas group B included 5 dogs that were euthanatized because of progressive lung dysfunction (n = 4) or cardiac arrest (1). Mean ± SD body weight of group- A dogs (30.9 ± 15.9 kg [68 ± 35 lb]) was significantly greater than that of group-B dogs (7.6 ± 1.8 kg [16.7 ± 4 lb]). Dogs with improved lung function had peak inspiratory pressure that decreased progressively, whereas lung compliance deteriorated in dogs in group B.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dyspneic dogs with severe pulmonary contusions may require and benefit from positive-pressure ventilation Prognosis is better for dogs that weigh > 25 kg (55 lb). (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1505–1509)

Abstract

Objective—To document pulmonary function, ventilator management, and outcome of dogs with thoracic trauma that required mechanical ventilation because of severe pulmonary contusions.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—10 dogs that required mechanical ventilation because of severe pulmonary contusions caused by blunt thoracic trauma.

Procedure—Signalment, historical data, arterial blood gas values, oxygen tension-based indices, ventilator settings, peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, tidal volume, and minute ventilation values were retrieved from medical records.

Results—All 10 dogs required positive-pressure ventilation because of dyspnea following trauma and had severely abnormal pulmonary function. Survival rate to discharge was 30%. Dogs were categorized into 2 groups; group A included 5 dogs in which pulmonary function improved during ventilation, whereas group B included 5 dogs that were euthanatized because of progressive lung dysfunction (n = 4) or cardiac arrest (1). Mean ± SD body weight of group- A dogs (30.9 ± 15.9 kg [68 ± 35 lb]) was significantly greater than that of group-B dogs (7.6 ± 1.8 kg [16.7 ± 4 lb]). Dogs with improved lung function had peak inspiratory pressure that decreased progressively, whereas lung compliance deteriorated in dogs in group B.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dyspneic dogs with severe pulmonary contusions may require and benefit from positive-pressure ventilation Prognosis is better for dogs that weigh > 25 kg (55 lb). (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1505–1509)