Advertisement

Causes of poor performance of horses during training, racing, or showing: 348 cases (1992–1996)

Benson B. Martin JrSection of Sports Medicine and Imaging, Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, 382 W Street Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

Search for other papers by Benson B. Martin Jr in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD, DACVS
,
Virginia B. ReefSection of Sports Medicine and Imaging, Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, 382 W Street Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

Search for other papers by Virginia B. Reef in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVIM
,
Eric J. ParenteSection of Sports Medicine and Imaging, Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, 382 W Street Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

Search for other papers by Eric J. Parente in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVS
, and
Abby D. SageDepartment of Clinical and Population Science, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Minnesota, 1365 Gortner Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Abby D. Sage in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS, VMD, DACVIM

Abstract

Objective—To determine results for horses undergoing a high-speed treadmill examination, including videoendoscopy of the pharynx and larynx before and during exercise, echocardiography before and after exercise, and electrocardiography before, during, and after exercise, because of poor performance.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—348 horses.

Results—A definitive diagnosis was obtained for 256 (73.5%) horses. One hundred forty-eight horses had dynamic obstruction of the airway during exercise, 33 had clinically important cardiac arrhythmias alone, 22 had a combination of dynamic airway obstruction and clinically important cardiac arrhythmias, 19 had poor cardiac fractional shortening immediately after exercise, 10 had exertional rhabdomyolyis, 15 had clinically apparent lameness, and 9 had other disorders. Thirtynine of the horses with dynamic obstruction of the airway during exercise had multiple airway abnormalities. Fifty-three horses also had subclinical myopathy.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a complete evaluation, including a highspeed treadmill examination, should be conducted in horses with poor performance, regardless or whether horses do or do not have a history of abnormal respiratory noises and particularly if the horses have grade- II or -III left laryngeal hemiplegia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:554–558)

Abstract

Objective—To determine results for horses undergoing a high-speed treadmill examination, including videoendoscopy of the pharynx and larynx before and during exercise, echocardiography before and after exercise, and electrocardiography before, during, and after exercise, because of poor performance.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—348 horses.

Results—A definitive diagnosis was obtained for 256 (73.5%) horses. One hundred forty-eight horses had dynamic obstruction of the airway during exercise, 33 had clinically important cardiac arrhythmias alone, 22 had a combination of dynamic airway obstruction and clinically important cardiac arrhythmias, 19 had poor cardiac fractional shortening immediately after exercise, 10 had exertional rhabdomyolyis, 15 had clinically apparent lameness, and 9 had other disorders. Thirtynine of the horses with dynamic obstruction of the airway during exercise had multiple airway abnormalities. Fifty-three horses also had subclinical myopathy.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a complete evaluation, including a highspeed treadmill examination, should be conducted in horses with poor performance, regardless or whether horses do or do not have a history of abnormal respiratory noises and particularly if the horses have grade- II or -III left laryngeal hemiplegia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:554–558)