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Prevalence of pituitary tumors among diabetic cats with insulin resistance

Denise A. ElliottDepartment of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 BVSc, DACVIM
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Edward C. FeldmanDepartments of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 DVM, DACVIM
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Philip D. KoblikDepartments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Valerie F. SamiiDepartments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Richard W. NelsonDepartments of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 DVM, DACVIM

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of pituitary tumors, detectable by means of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, in cats with insulin resistance suspected to have acromegaly or hyperadrenocorticism versus cats with well-controlled diabetes mellitus.

Design—Case series.

Animals—16 cats with insulin resistance that were also suspected to have acromegaly (n = 12) or pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (4) and 8 cats with well-controlled diabetes mellitus.

Procedure—Computed tomography was performed on all 16 cats with insulin resistance and 2 cats in which diabetes mellitus was well-controlled. The remaining 6 cats in which diabetes mellitus was wellcontrolled underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Images were obtained before and immediately after IV administration of contrast medium.

Results—Computed tomography revealed a mass in the region of the pituitary gland in all 16 cats with insulin resistance. Maximum width of the masses ranged from 4.4 to 12.7 mm; maximum height ranged from 3.1 to 12.6 mm. Results of computed tomography performed on 2 cats with well-controlled diabetes and magnetic resonance imaging performed on the remaining 6 cats were considered normal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cats with insulin resistance suspected to have acromegaly or pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism are likely to have a pituitary mass detectable by means of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216: 1765–1768)

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of pituitary tumors, detectable by means of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, in cats with insulin resistance suspected to have acromegaly or hyperadrenocorticism versus cats with well-controlled diabetes mellitus.

Design—Case series.

Animals—16 cats with insulin resistance that were also suspected to have acromegaly (n = 12) or pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (4) and 8 cats with well-controlled diabetes mellitus.

Procedure—Computed tomography was performed on all 16 cats with insulin resistance and 2 cats in which diabetes mellitus was well-controlled. The remaining 6 cats in which diabetes mellitus was wellcontrolled underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Images were obtained before and immediately after IV administration of contrast medium.

Results—Computed tomography revealed a mass in the region of the pituitary gland in all 16 cats with insulin resistance. Maximum width of the masses ranged from 4.4 to 12.7 mm; maximum height ranged from 3.1 to 12.6 mm. Results of computed tomography performed on 2 cats with well-controlled diabetes and magnetic resonance imaging performed on the remaining 6 cats were considered normal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cats with insulin resistance suspected to have acromegaly or pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism are likely to have a pituitary mass detectable by means of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216: 1765–1768)