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Autologous blood collection and transfusion in cats undergoing partial craniectomy

Jason V. FuscoDepartment of Surgery,The Bobst Hospital of The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Ann E. HohenhausJaqua Transfusion Medicine Service,The Bobst Hospital of The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Sean W. AikenDepartment of Surgery,The Bobst Hospital of The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Richard J. JosephDepartment of Medicine,The Bobst Hospital of The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Jason M. BergDepartment of Medicine,The Bobst Hospital of The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Abstract

Objective—To describe the procedure for autologous blood donation and associated complications in cats undergoing partial craniectomy for mass removal.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—15 cats with intracranial mass confirmed by computed tomographic scan, no evidence of renal failure, and PCV ≥ 22%.

Procedure—One unit (60 ml) of blood was collected and stored 7 to 17 days before surgery and transfused during the perioperative period if needed. The PCV was measured before donation, before surgery, during surgery, and after surgery to assess effect of donation on PCV before surgery and effect of transfusion on PCV after surgery. Cats were evaluated for donation complications, iatrogenic anemia, and adverse reactions associated with administration of autologous blood.

Results—Complications associated with phlebotomy were not detected. Fifteen cats underwent partial craniectomy 7 to 17 days after blood donation; all had histologic confirmation of meningioma by examination of tissue obtained at surgery. Eleven cats received autologous blood transfusions. None of the cats received allogeneic blood transfusions. Transfusion reactions were not observed. Subclinical iatrogenic anemia was detected in 3 cats. Two cats were considered to have received excessive transfusion, and 3 cats received inadequate transfusion. All cats undergoing partial craniectomy were discharged from the hospital and were alive > 6 months after surgery.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Autologous blood donation before surgery was considered safe for cats undergoing partial craniectomy for resection of meningioma. The only complication observed was iatrogenic anemia. The procedure contributed to blood conservation in our hospital. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1584–1588)

Abstract

Objective—To describe the procedure for autologous blood donation and associated complications in cats undergoing partial craniectomy for mass removal.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—15 cats with intracranial mass confirmed by computed tomographic scan, no evidence of renal failure, and PCV ≥ 22%.

Procedure—One unit (60 ml) of blood was collected and stored 7 to 17 days before surgery and transfused during the perioperative period if needed. The PCV was measured before donation, before surgery, during surgery, and after surgery to assess effect of donation on PCV before surgery and effect of transfusion on PCV after surgery. Cats were evaluated for donation complications, iatrogenic anemia, and adverse reactions associated with administration of autologous blood.

Results—Complications associated with phlebotomy were not detected. Fifteen cats underwent partial craniectomy 7 to 17 days after blood donation; all had histologic confirmation of meningioma by examination of tissue obtained at surgery. Eleven cats received autologous blood transfusions. None of the cats received allogeneic blood transfusions. Transfusion reactions were not observed. Subclinical iatrogenic anemia was detected in 3 cats. Two cats were considered to have received excessive transfusion, and 3 cats received inadequate transfusion. All cats undergoing partial craniectomy were discharged from the hospital and were alive > 6 months after surgery.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Autologous blood donation before surgery was considered safe for cats undergoing partial craniectomy for resection of meningioma. The only complication observed was iatrogenic anemia. The procedure contributed to blood conservation in our hospital. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1584–1588)