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Effects of housing environment on oral absorption of acetaminophen in healthy Beagles

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  • 1 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effects of housing environment on oral absorption of acetaminophen in dogs.

ANIMALS

6 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Acetaminophen (325 mg, PO; mean dose, 31.1 mg/kg) was administered in a crossover study design with dogs housed in their normal environment or in a cage in an unfamiliar environment. There was a 7-day washout period between phases. Blood samples were collected for 24 hours following acetaminophen administration, and plasma acetaminophen concentrations were determined with high-pressure liquid chromatography.

RESULTS

A 2-compartment model with lag time was the best fit for both phases of the study. None of the primary or secondary pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly different between the 2 housing environments.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings suggested that in dogs, housing environment (normal environment vs a cage in an unfamiliar environment) did not significantly affect oral absorption and, by extension, gastric emptying of acetaminophen.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effects of housing environment on oral absorption of acetaminophen in dogs.

ANIMALS

6 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Acetaminophen (325 mg, PO; mean dose, 31.1 mg/kg) was administered in a crossover study design with dogs housed in their normal environment or in a cage in an unfamiliar environment. There was a 7-day washout period between phases. Blood samples were collected for 24 hours following acetaminophen administration, and plasma acetaminophen concentrations were determined with high-pressure liquid chromatography.

RESULTS

A 2-compartment model with lag time was the best fit for both phases of the study. None of the primary or secondary pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly different between the 2 housing environments.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings suggested that in dogs, housing environment (normal environment vs a cage in an unfamiliar environment) did not significantly affect oral absorption and, by extension, gastric emptying of acetaminophen.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Papich (mgpapich@ncsu.edu)