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Comparison of the effects of open-tube and evacuated tube–assisted sampling methods on thromboelastography variables for blood samples from healthy dogs

Verena Steiner Mag med vet1, Ilse Schwendenwein Dr med vet2, Iwan Anton Burgener PhD, Dr med vet1, Maximilian Pagitz Dr med vet1, Alexander Tichy Dr rer nat3, and Nicole Luckschander-Zeller PhD, Dr med vet1
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  • 1 Department for Companion Animals and Horses, Clinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
  • | 2 Department for Pathobiology, Central Laboratory, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
  • | 3 Platform for Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effects of open-tube blood sampling with previously investigated blood sampling methods via evacuated tube on thromboelastography variables for blood samples from dogs.

ANIMALS

10 healthy Beagles from the research colony owned by the Clinic of Small Animal Internal Medicine, University Veterinary of Medicine, Vienna, were used.

PROCEDURES

In this prospective study, blood was sampled from each dog serially into citrate solution–containing tubes via 20-gauge needle. One evacuated tube was filled from a jugular vein via the evacuated tube port, and the second tube was opened and filled by catching blood flowing through the needle from a lateral saphenous vein. Venipuncture quality was scored with a previously described method. Thromboelastography was performed for each sample.

RESULTS

Inferential statistics used with the Wilcoxon signed rank test showed significant differences in reaction time (R) of 3.43 ± 0.84 minutes versus 4.53 ± 0.62 minutes (mean ± SD) between evacuated tube assisted and open-tube sampling, respectively. No other significant differences were identified.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The sampling methods compared have a small but significant effect on R in thromboelastographic analysis for blood samples from healthy dogs. Shear stress by vacuum sampling seems to accelerate coagulation in jugular blood samples harvested by evacuated tube, resulting in a shortened R. Results suggested that the open-tube method avoids shear stress induced activation of coagulation and is an appropriate sampling method for thromboelastography when used within a standardized protocol.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effects of open-tube blood sampling with previously investigated blood sampling methods via evacuated tube on thromboelastography variables for blood samples from dogs.

ANIMALS

10 healthy Beagles from the research colony owned by the Clinic of Small Animal Internal Medicine, University Veterinary of Medicine, Vienna, were used.

PROCEDURES

In this prospective study, blood was sampled from each dog serially into citrate solution–containing tubes via 20-gauge needle. One evacuated tube was filled from a jugular vein via the evacuated tube port, and the second tube was opened and filled by catching blood flowing through the needle from a lateral saphenous vein. Venipuncture quality was scored with a previously described method. Thromboelastography was performed for each sample.

RESULTS

Inferential statistics used with the Wilcoxon signed rank test showed significant differences in reaction time (R) of 3.43 ± 0.84 minutes versus 4.53 ± 0.62 minutes (mean ± SD) between evacuated tube assisted and open-tube sampling, respectively. No other significant differences were identified.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The sampling methods compared have a small but significant effect on R in thromboelastographic analysis for blood samples from healthy dogs. Shear stress by vacuum sampling seems to accelerate coagulation in jugular blood samples harvested by evacuated tube, resulting in a shortened R. Results suggested that the open-tube method avoids shear stress induced activation of coagulation and is an appropriate sampling method for thromboelastography when used within a standardized protocol.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Steiner (verena.steiner@vetmeduni.ac.at)