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MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in the serum and renal tissues of cats with experimentally induced chronic kidney disease: a preliminary study

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
  • | 2 Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify differentially expressed microRNA in the serum and renal tissues of cats with experimentally induced chronic kidney disease (CKD).

SAMPLE

Banked renal tissues and serum from 4 cats.

PROCEDURES

Cats previously underwent 90-minute unilateral ischemia with delayed contralateral nephrectomy 3 months after ischemia. Tissues were collected from the contralateral kidney at the time of nephrectomy and from the ischemic kidney 6 months after nephrectomy (study end). Serum was collected prior to ischemia (baseline serum) and at study end (end point serum). Total RNA was isolated from tissues and serum, and microRNA sequencing was performed with differential expression analysis between the contralateral and ischemic kidney and baseline and end point serum.

RESULTS

20 microRNAs were differentially expressed between ischemic and contralateral kidneys, and 52 microRNAs were differentially expressed between end point and baseline serum. Five microRNAs were mutually differentially expressed between ischemic and contralateral kidneys and baseline and end point serum, with 4 (mir-21, mir-146, mir-199, and mir-235) having increased expression in both the ischemic kidney and end point serum and 1 (mir-382) having increased expression in the ischemic kidney and decreased expression in end point serum. Predicted target search for these microRNA revealed multiple genes previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of feline CKD, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β, hepatocyte growth factor, fibronectin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

MicroRNAs were differentially expressed after CKD induction in this preliminary study. Regulation of renal fibrosis in feline CKD may occur through microRNA regulation of mRNAs of pro- and anti-fibrotic genes.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify differentially expressed microRNA in the serum and renal tissues of cats with experimentally induced chronic kidney disease (CKD).

SAMPLE

Banked renal tissues and serum from 4 cats.

PROCEDURES

Cats previously underwent 90-minute unilateral ischemia with delayed contralateral nephrectomy 3 months after ischemia. Tissues were collected from the contralateral kidney at the time of nephrectomy and from the ischemic kidney 6 months after nephrectomy (study end). Serum was collected prior to ischemia (baseline serum) and at study end (end point serum). Total RNA was isolated from tissues and serum, and microRNA sequencing was performed with differential expression analysis between the contralateral and ischemic kidney and baseline and end point serum.

RESULTS

20 microRNAs were differentially expressed between ischemic and contralateral kidneys, and 52 microRNAs were differentially expressed between end point and baseline serum. Five microRNAs were mutually differentially expressed between ischemic and contralateral kidneys and baseline and end point serum, with 4 (mir-21, mir-146, mir-199, and mir-235) having increased expression in both the ischemic kidney and end point serum and 1 (mir-382) having increased expression in the ischemic kidney and decreased expression in end point serum. Predicted target search for these microRNA revealed multiple genes previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of feline CKD, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β, hepatocyte growth factor, fibronectin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

MicroRNAs were differentially expressed after CKD induction in this preliminary study. Regulation of renal fibrosis in feline CKD may occur through microRNA regulation of mRNAs of pro- and anti-fibrotic genes.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 73 KB)

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Grimes (jgrimes@uga.edu)