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Evaluation of serum histone concentrations and their associations with hemostasis, markers of inflammation, and outcome in dogs with naturally occurring acute pancreatitis

Ran Nivy DVM1,3, Sharon Kuzi VMD1, Avital Yochai DVM, MSc1, Itamar Aroch DVM1, and Yaron Bruchim DVM, PhD2,3
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  • 1 From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 761001, Israel
  • | 2 From the Emergency and Critical Care, Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 761001, Israel
  • | 3 From the Department of Internal Medicine, Ben-Shemen Specialist Referral Center, Ben-Shemen, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare serum concentrations of histones and inflammatory markers in dogs with acute pancreatitis and healthy control dogs, investigate associations of these variables with coagulation test results and survival (vs nonsurvival) to hospital discharge, and examine the prognostic utility of clinical findings and routine laboratory and coagulation tests in affected dogs.

ANIMALS

36 dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs with findings consistent with acute pancreatitis (n = 29) and healthy control dogs (7) were enrolled in a prospective, observational study. Serum concentrations of histones, interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor-necrosis factor-α were assessed for all dogs. Clinical (including ultrasonographic) findings, relevant history, routine laboratory and coagulation test results, and outcomes were recorded for dogs with pancreatitis. Variables were assessed to determine an association with outcome for affected dogs and hospitalization time for survivors; histone concentrations and markers of inflammation were compared among survivors, nonsurvivors, and controls. Correlation between quantitative variables was investigated.

RESULTS

Serum histone and IL-6 concentrations did not differentiate survivors (n = 23) from nonsurvivors (6); IL-6 concentrations in affected dogs were correlated with 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycero glutaric acid-(6′-methylresorufin) ester lipase activity (rS = 0.436) and hospitalization time (rS = 0.528). Pancreatitis-associated peritoneal fluid, obtundation, and jaundice were more common, and serum bilirubin concentration, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, and prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times were greater in nonsurvivors than in survivors. Thromboelastometric changes consistent with hypercoagulability were detected in survivors; hypocoagulability was detected in 2 nonsurvivors.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Serum histone concentrations were not associated with presence of acute pancreatitis or outcome for affected dogs. Further research is needed to investigate the clinical and therapeutic implications of hypocoagulability, hepatocellular injury, and pancreatitis-associated peritoneal fluid in affected dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2021;82:701–711)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare serum concentrations of histones and inflammatory markers in dogs with acute pancreatitis and healthy control dogs, investigate associations of these variables with coagulation test results and survival (vs nonsurvival) to hospital discharge, and examine the prognostic utility of clinical findings and routine laboratory and coagulation tests in affected dogs.

ANIMALS

36 dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs with findings consistent with acute pancreatitis (n = 29) and healthy control dogs (7) were enrolled in a prospective, observational study. Serum concentrations of histones, interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor-necrosis factor-α were assessed for all dogs. Clinical (including ultrasonographic) findings, relevant history, routine laboratory and coagulation test results, and outcomes were recorded for dogs with pancreatitis. Variables were assessed to determine an association with outcome for affected dogs and hospitalization time for survivors; histone concentrations and markers of inflammation were compared among survivors, nonsurvivors, and controls. Correlation between quantitative variables was investigated.

RESULTS

Serum histone and IL-6 concentrations did not differentiate survivors (n = 23) from nonsurvivors (6); IL-6 concentrations in affected dogs were correlated with 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycero glutaric acid-(6′-methylresorufin) ester lipase activity (rS = 0.436) and hospitalization time (rS = 0.528). Pancreatitis-associated peritoneal fluid, obtundation, and jaundice were more common, and serum bilirubin concentration, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, and prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times were greater in nonsurvivors than in survivors. Thromboelastometric changes consistent with hypercoagulability were detected in survivors; hypocoagulability was detected in 2 nonsurvivors.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Serum histone concentrations were not associated with presence of acute pancreatitis or outcome for affected dogs. Further research is needed to investigate the clinical and therapeutic implications of hypocoagulability, hepatocellular injury, and pancreatitis-associated peritoneal fluid in affected dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2021;82:701–711)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Nivy (rannivy1@gmail.com).