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Identification of serum microRNAs with differential expression between dogs with splenic masses and healthy dogs with histologically normal spleens

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify differential microRNA (miRNA) expression in dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma, splenic hematoma, and histologically normal spleens.

ANIMALS

Dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma (n = 10), splenic hematoma (n = 5), and histologically normal spleens (n = 5).

PROCEDURES

Splenic tissue and serum samples were collected from dogs with splenic masses (ie, hemangiosarcoma or hematoma samples) and healthy control dogs (ie, control samples), and total RNA was extracted. Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was performed with 28 miRNAs associated with hemangiosarcoma, angiosarcoma, or associated genes. Differential expression analysis was performed.

RESULTS

Control tissue and serum samples had similar miRNA expression patterns, and hemangiosarcoma tissue and serum samples did not. Hemangiosarcoma serum samples had higher expression than hemangiosarcoma tissue for 13 miRNAs and lower expression for 1 miRNA. Control tissue and hemangiosarcoma tissue had varying expressions for 12 miRNAs, with 10 more highly expressed in control samples and 2 more highly expressed in hemangiosarcoma samples. Five miRNAs (miR-214-3p, miR-452, miR-494-3p, miR-497-5p, miR-543) had significantly different expression in serum between dogs with splenic masses (ie, hemangiosarcoma or hematoma) and serum of dogs with histologically normal spleens, with higher expression in the serum of dogs with splenic masses for all 5 miRNAs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

5 circulating miRNAs were identified that distinguished dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma or hematoma from those with histologically normal spleens. These 5 miRNAs had higher expression in dogs with splenic masses, indicating upregulation of these circulating miRNAs occurs in these splenic disease states. These miRNAs may be useful as a noninvasive screening tool that uses serum to identify dogs with splenic masses.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify differential microRNA (miRNA) expression in dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma, splenic hematoma, and histologically normal spleens.

ANIMALS

Dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma (n = 10), splenic hematoma (n = 5), and histologically normal spleens (n = 5).

PROCEDURES

Splenic tissue and serum samples were collected from dogs with splenic masses (ie, hemangiosarcoma or hematoma samples) and healthy control dogs (ie, control samples), and total RNA was extracted. Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was performed with 28 miRNAs associated with hemangiosarcoma, angiosarcoma, or associated genes. Differential expression analysis was performed.

RESULTS

Control tissue and serum samples had similar miRNA expression patterns, and hemangiosarcoma tissue and serum samples did not. Hemangiosarcoma serum samples had higher expression than hemangiosarcoma tissue for 13 miRNAs and lower expression for 1 miRNA. Control tissue and hemangiosarcoma tissue had varying expressions for 12 miRNAs, with 10 more highly expressed in control samples and 2 more highly expressed in hemangiosarcoma samples. Five miRNAs (miR-214-3p, miR-452, miR-494-3p, miR-497-5p, miR-543) had significantly different expression in serum between dogs with splenic masses (ie, hemangiosarcoma or hematoma) and serum of dogs with histologically normal spleens, with higher expression in the serum of dogs with splenic masses for all 5 miRNAs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

5 circulating miRNAs were identified that distinguished dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma or hematoma from those with histologically normal spleens. These 5 miRNAs had higher expression in dogs with splenic masses, indicating upregulation of these circulating miRNAs occurs in these splenic disease states. These miRNAs may be useful as a noninvasive screening tool that uses serum to identify dogs with splenic masses.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 456 kb)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Grimes (jgrimes@uga.edu).