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Radiographic assessment of splenic size and correlation with splenic measurements estimated by use of computed tomography in healthy cats

Youjung Jang DVM, MS1, Eunji Lee DVM1, Sang-Kwon Lee DVM, MS1, Hyejin Je DVM, MS1, Jin-Woo Jung DVM, MS1, Seolyn Jang DVM1, Bo-Kwon Choi DVM1, Suhyun Lee DVM1, Saran Chhoey DVM1, and Jihye Choi DVM, PhD1
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  • 1 From the Department of Veterinary Medical Imaging, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Plus Project Team, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate radiographic variables for correlation with splenic size as estimated with CT in cats.

ANIMALS

38 healthy adult cats.

PROCEDURES

The width and height of the splenic head and total length, segmental length, and width of the spleen were measured on radiographic and CT images obtained from 10 cats in prospective, exploratory experiments. Distance between the splenic head and left kidney, anatomic locations of the head and tail of the spleen, and CT-derived splenic volume were also assessed. Correlation and agreement between radiographic and CT measurements and interobserver agreement for measurements with each method were determined. A retrospective evaluation of radiographs obtained without sedation or anesthesia for 28 cats was performed to establish preliminary guidelines for the measurement deemed the most reliable estimator of splenic size.

RESULTS

Radiographic measurements of total and segmental splenic length were significantly correlated with the respective CT measurements and with splenic volume. Agreement between radiographic and CT measurements of segmental length was good; interobserver agreement was excellent for all variables. In retrospective evaluations, median segmental length of the spleen was 57.87 mm (range, 34.72 to 105.44 mm) on radiographs; the caudal border of the splenic head on lateral views was located from the cranial part of L1 to the caudal part of L2, and the caudal border of the splenic tail on ventrodorsal views was located from the caudal part of L2 to the caudal part of L5.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that segmental length of the spleen on radiographs is a reliable estimator of splenic size in healthy cats.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate radiographic variables for correlation with splenic size as estimated with CT in cats.

ANIMALS

38 healthy adult cats.

PROCEDURES

The width and height of the splenic head and total length, segmental length, and width of the spleen were measured on radiographic and CT images obtained from 10 cats in prospective, exploratory experiments. Distance between the splenic head and left kidney, anatomic locations of the head and tail of the spleen, and CT-derived splenic volume were also assessed. Correlation and agreement between radiographic and CT measurements and interobserver agreement for measurements with each method were determined. A retrospective evaluation of radiographs obtained without sedation or anesthesia for 28 cats was performed to establish preliminary guidelines for the measurement deemed the most reliable estimator of splenic size.

RESULTS

Radiographic measurements of total and segmental splenic length were significantly correlated with the respective CT measurements and with splenic volume. Agreement between radiographic and CT measurements of segmental length was good; interobserver agreement was excellent for all variables. In retrospective evaluations, median segmental length of the spleen was 57.87 mm (range, 34.72 to 105.44 mm) on radiographs; the caudal border of the splenic head on lateral views was located from the cranial part of L1 to the caudal part of L2, and the caudal border of the splenic tail on ventrodorsal views was located from the caudal part of L2 to the caudal part of L5.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that segmental length of the spleen on radiographs is a reliable estimator of splenic size in healthy cats.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Choi (imsono@chonnam.ac.kr).