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Evaluation of surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for rapid measurement of progesterone concentration in bitches

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  • 1 Unité de Médecine de l'Elevage et du Sport, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France.
  • | 2 Centre d'Etude en Reproduction des Carnivores, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France.
  • | 3 Service de Biochimie, VetAgro Sup, 69280 Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare progesterone (P4) concentrations measured with surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) in serum and plasma samples of client-owned bitches of various ages and breeds and to determine reference ranges for P4 concentrations at various stages of the estrous cycle.

SAMPLES

102 serum samples and 104 plasma samples.

PROCEDURES

In experiment 1, 1 aliquot each of serum and plasma was analyzed for P4 concentration by use of SPFS incorporated in a veterinary-specific point-of-care immunologic analyzer and CLIA. In experiment 2, serum collected from bitches in various stages of the estrous cycle was analyzed for P4 concentration by use of SPFS to establish reference ranges for each stage.

RESULTS

In experiment 1, P4 concentrations measured by SPFS and CLIA were highly correlated (serum, r = 0.966; plasma, r = 0.968). In experiment 2, ranges of serum basal (proestrous) P4 concentrations (n = 114) and P4 concentrations at the estimated time of ovulation (76), during pregnancy or diestrus (107), and during the prepartum period (50) measured with SPFS were 0.42 to 1.46 ng/mL, 3.69 to 7.85 ng/mL, 11.73 to 28.24 ng/mL, and 1.54 to 3.22 ng/mL, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Because serum and plasma P4 concentrations measured with SPFS were highly correlated with those measured with CLIA and ranges of serum P4 concentrations measured with SPFS for each of phase of the estrous cycle were well-defined for the large sample size, veterinarians may be able to accurately use this veterinary-specific point-of-care immunologic analyzer with SPFS methodology to determine P4 concentrations of bitches in their daily practice.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare progesterone (P4) concentrations measured with surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) in serum and plasma samples of client-owned bitches of various ages and breeds and to determine reference ranges for P4 concentrations at various stages of the estrous cycle.

SAMPLES

102 serum samples and 104 plasma samples.

PROCEDURES

In experiment 1, 1 aliquot each of serum and plasma was analyzed for P4 concentration by use of SPFS incorporated in a veterinary-specific point-of-care immunologic analyzer and CLIA. In experiment 2, serum collected from bitches in various stages of the estrous cycle was analyzed for P4 concentration by use of SPFS to establish reference ranges for each stage.

RESULTS

In experiment 1, P4 concentrations measured by SPFS and CLIA were highly correlated (serum, r = 0.966; plasma, r = 0.968). In experiment 2, ranges of serum basal (proestrous) P4 concentrations (n = 114) and P4 concentrations at the estimated time of ovulation (76), during pregnancy or diestrus (107), and during the prepartum period (50) measured with SPFS were 0.42 to 1.46 ng/mL, 3.69 to 7.85 ng/mL, 11.73 to 28.24 ng/mL, and 1.54 to 3.22 ng/mL, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Because serum and plasma P4 concentrations measured with SPFS were highly correlated with those measured with CLIA and ranges of serum P4 concentrations measured with SPFS for each of phase of the estrous cycle were well-defined for the large sample size, veterinarians may be able to accurately use this veterinary-specific point-of-care immunologic analyzer with SPFS methodology to determine P4 concentrations of bitches in their daily practice.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Fontbonne (alain.fontbonne@vet-alfort.fr).