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Randomized, placebo-controlled, 28-day safety and pharmacokinetics evaluation of repeated oral cannabidiol administration in healthy dogs

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  • 1 Human and Animal Research Program, Canopy Animal Health, Canopy Growth Corporation, Smith Falls, ON K7A 3K8, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the safety and pharmacokinetics of various doses of plant-derived cannabidiol (CBD) versus placebo following repeated oral administration.

ANIMALS

20 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial, dogs were randomized to 5 groups balanced in body weight and sex (n = 4 dogs/group) and received a CBD (1, 2, 4, or 12 mg/kg; from cannabis extract) or placebo oil formulation PO once daily for 28 days. Outcome variables were assessed through daily health observations, veterinary examinations, CBC, and serum biochemical analysis. Blood samples were collected at various time points to estimate 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles of CBD and selected metabolites (7-carboxy-CBD and 7-hydroxy-CBD).

RESULTS

Repeated CBD administration was well tolerated by dogs, with no clinically important changes in measured safety outcomes. Veterinary examinations revealed no clinically important abnormal findings. Adverse events were mild in severity. Relative to placebo administration, CBD administration at 12 mg/kg/d resulted in more gastrointestinal adverse events (mainly hypersalivation) and significantly higher serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Total systemic exposure to CBD increased on a dose-dependent basis following both acute (first dose) and chronic (28 days) administration. Within each CBD dose group, repeated administration increased total systemic exposure to CBD 1.6- to 3.3-fold. The 24-hour trough plasma CBD concentrations were also dose dependent, with a steady state reached following 2 weeks of administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Repeated, daily oral administration of the CBD formulation led to dose-dependent increases in total systemic exposure to CBD and 24-hour trough plasma concentrations in healthy dogs. These findings could help guide dose selection.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the safety and pharmacokinetics of various doses of plant-derived cannabidiol (CBD) versus placebo following repeated oral administration.

ANIMALS

20 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial, dogs were randomized to 5 groups balanced in body weight and sex (n = 4 dogs/group) and received a CBD (1, 2, 4, or 12 mg/kg; from cannabis extract) or placebo oil formulation PO once daily for 28 days. Outcome variables were assessed through daily health observations, veterinary examinations, CBC, and serum biochemical analysis. Blood samples were collected at various time points to estimate 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles of CBD and selected metabolites (7-carboxy-CBD and 7-hydroxy-CBD).

RESULTS

Repeated CBD administration was well tolerated by dogs, with no clinically important changes in measured safety outcomes. Veterinary examinations revealed no clinically important abnormal findings. Adverse events were mild in severity. Relative to placebo administration, CBD administration at 12 mg/kg/d resulted in more gastrointestinal adverse events (mainly hypersalivation) and significantly higher serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Total systemic exposure to CBD increased on a dose-dependent basis following both acute (first dose) and chronic (28 days) administration. Within each CBD dose group, repeated administration increased total systemic exposure to CBD 1.6- to 3.3-fold. The 24-hour trough plasma CBD concentrations were also dose dependent, with a steady state reached following 2 weeks of administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Repeated, daily oral administration of the CBD formulation led to dose-dependent increases in total systemic exposure to CBD and 24-hour trough plasma concentrations in healthy dogs. These findings could help guide dose selection.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Figure S1 (PDF 161 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S2 (PDF 180 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 184 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S2 (PDF 313 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S3 (PDF 246 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S4 (PDF 180 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S5 (PDF 182 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S6 (PDF 184 KB)

Contributor Notes

Ms. Paulionis' present address is Altasciences, Laval, QC H7V 4B3, Canada.

Address correspondence to Dr. Vaughn (dana.vaughn@canopygrowth.com).