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Assessment of a vessel and tissue–sealing device for ovariectomy in chickens to evaluate the potential application of the procedure to other avian species

Jessica L. Sullivan DVM, MS1, Nobuko Wakamatsu BVSc, PhD2, Ji-Hang Yin DVM, MS2, Tanner Roberts DVM1, and R. Avery Bennett DVM, MS1
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  • 1 Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
  • | 2 Departments of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the feasibility of a novel technique involving a vessel and tissue–sealing device (VTSD) for ovariectomy in chickens to evaluate the potential application of the procedure to other avian species.

ANIMALS

20 domestic laying hens (Gallus domesticus), of which 10 were immature (< 4 months old) and 10 were adults (> 18 months old).

PROCEDURES

Ovariectomy was performed with a VTSD through a left lateral celiotomy. Birds were allowed to recover for 14 days after the procedure and then were euthanized for necropsy. A board-certified veterinary pathologist performed complete necropsies, with particular attention to identifying any remaining ovarian tissue.

RESULTS

All birds survived the procedure. For the mature and juvenile birds, the mean ± SD durations of anesthesia (interval from intubation to extubation) were 67.2 ± 7.6 minutes and 50.5 ± 5.1 minutes, respectively, and mean durations of surgery were 45.3 ± 8.5 minutes and 31.6 ± 5.1 minutes, respectively. Three birds had severe hemorrhage during ovariectomy. At necropsy, ovarian tissue was present grossly in 2 mature birds and histologically in 6 additional birds (2 mature and 4 juvenile birds), indicating incomplete excision in 8 (40%) birds.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that the evaluated VTSD can be used to successfully perform ovariectomies in both juvenile and mature chickens, although the procedure was associated with major hemorrhage and incomplete excision of ovarian tissue in some cases. Use of this VTSD for ovariectomy in birds of other species, particularly birds with reproductive tract disease, should be investigated.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the feasibility of a novel technique involving a vessel and tissue–sealing device (VTSD) for ovariectomy in chickens to evaluate the potential application of the procedure to other avian species.

ANIMALS

20 domestic laying hens (Gallus domesticus), of which 10 were immature (< 4 months old) and 10 were adults (> 18 months old).

PROCEDURES

Ovariectomy was performed with a VTSD through a left lateral celiotomy. Birds were allowed to recover for 14 days after the procedure and then were euthanized for necropsy. A board-certified veterinary pathologist performed complete necropsies, with particular attention to identifying any remaining ovarian tissue.

RESULTS

All birds survived the procedure. For the mature and juvenile birds, the mean ± SD durations of anesthesia (interval from intubation to extubation) were 67.2 ± 7.6 minutes and 50.5 ± 5.1 minutes, respectively, and mean durations of surgery were 45.3 ± 8.5 minutes and 31.6 ± 5.1 minutes, respectively. Three birds had severe hemorrhage during ovariectomy. At necropsy, ovarian tissue was present grossly in 2 mature birds and histologically in 6 additional birds (2 mature and 4 juvenile birds), indicating incomplete excision in 8 (40%) birds.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that the evaluated VTSD can be used to successfully perform ovariectomies in both juvenile and mature chickens, although the procedure was associated with major hemorrhage and incomplete excision of ovarian tissue in some cases. Use of this VTSD for ovariectomy in birds of other species, particularly birds with reproductive tract disease, should be investigated.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Sullivan's present address is Southwest Veterinary Surgical Service, Gilbert, AZ 85233.

Dr. Wakamatsu's present address is the Department of Comparative Pathobiology, Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Dr. Yin's present address is the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.

Address correspondence to Dr. Sullivan (jsullivan@swvetsurgery.com).