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Pharmacokinetics of grapiprant administered to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) after food was withheld for 24 hours

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  • 1 From the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, and K. L. Maddy Equine Analytical Pharma-cology Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medi-cine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify an oral dose of grapiprant for red-tailed hawks (RTHAs; Buteo jamaicensis) that would achieve a plasma concentration > 164 ng/mL, which is considered therapeutic for dogs with osteoarthritis.

ANIMALS

6 healthy adult RTHAs.

PROCEDURES

A preliminary study, in which grapiprant (4 mg/kg [n = 2], 11 mg/kg [2], or 45 mg/kg [2]) was delivered into the crop of RTHAs from which food had been withheld for 24 hours, was performed to obtained pharmacokinetic data for use with modeling software to simulate results for grapiprant doses of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 mg/kg. Simulation results directed our selection of the grapiprant dose administered to the RTHAs in a single-dose study. Plasma grapiprant concentration, body weight, and gastrointestinal signs of RTHAs were monitored.

RESULTS

On the basis of results from the preliminary study and simulations, a grapiprant dose of 30 mg/kg was used in the single-dose study. The geometric mean maximum observed plasma concentration of grapiprant was 3,184 ng/mL, time to maximum plasma grapiprant concentration was 2.0 hours, and the harmonic mean terminal half-life was 17.1 hours. No substantial adverse effects were observed.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although the single dose of grapiprant (30 mg/kg) delivered into the crop achieved plasma concentrations > 164 ng/mL in the RTHAs, it was unknown whether this concentration would be therapeutic for birds. Further research that incorporates multidose assessments, safety monitoring, and pharmacodynamic data collection is warranted on the use of grapiprant in RTHAs from which food was withheld versus not withheld.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify an oral dose of grapiprant for red-tailed hawks (RTHAs; Buteo jamaicensis) that would achieve a plasma concentration > 164 ng/mL, which is considered therapeutic for dogs with osteoarthritis.

ANIMALS

6 healthy adult RTHAs.

PROCEDURES

A preliminary study, in which grapiprant (4 mg/kg [n = 2], 11 mg/kg [2], or 45 mg/kg [2]) was delivered into the crop of RTHAs from which food had been withheld for 24 hours, was performed to obtained pharmacokinetic data for use with modeling software to simulate results for grapiprant doses of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 mg/kg. Simulation results directed our selection of the grapiprant dose administered to the RTHAs in a single-dose study. Plasma grapiprant concentration, body weight, and gastrointestinal signs of RTHAs were monitored.

RESULTS

On the basis of results from the preliminary study and simulations, a grapiprant dose of 30 mg/kg was used in the single-dose study. The geometric mean maximum observed plasma concentration of grapiprant was 3,184 ng/mL, time to maximum plasma grapiprant concentration was 2.0 hours, and the harmonic mean terminal half-life was 17.1 hours. No substantial adverse effects were observed.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although the single dose of grapiprant (30 mg/kg) delivered into the crop achieved plasma concentrations > 164 ng/mL in the RTHAs, it was unknown whether this concentration would be therapeutic for birds. Further research that incorporates multidose assessments, safety monitoring, and pharmacodynamic data collection is warranted on the use of grapiprant in RTHAs from which food was withheld versus not withheld.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 198 KB)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Paul-Murphy (paulmurphy@ucdavis.edu).