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Effect of slice thickness on computed tomographic perfusion analysis of the pancreas in healthy dogs

Seungjo Park DVM, MS1, Jin-Woo Jung DVM1, Hyejin Je DVM1, Youjung Jang DVM1, and Jihye Choi DVM, PHD1
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  • 1 1Department of Veterinary Medical Imaging, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Plus Project Team, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of slice thickness on CT perfusion analysis of the pancreas in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

12 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

After precontrast CT scans, CT perfusion scans of the pancreatic body were performed every second for 30 seconds by sequential CT scanning after injection of contrast medium (iohexol; 300 mg of 1/kg) at a rate of 3 mL/s. Each dog underwent CT perfusion scans twice in a crossover-design study with 2 different slice thicknesses (2.4 and 4.8 mm). Computed tomographic pancreatic perfusion variables, including blood flow, blood volume determined with the maximum slope model, times to the start of enhancement and peak enhancement, permeability, and blood volume determined by Patlak plot analysis, were measured independently by 2 reviewers. The CT perfusion variables were compared between slice thicknesses. Interoperator reproducibility was determined by ICC calculation.

RESULTS

Interoperator reproducibility of CT perfusion variable measurements was excellent on 2.4-mm (mean ± SD ICC, 0.81 ± 0.17) and 4.8-mm (0.90 ± 0.07) slice thicknesses, except for time to peak pancreatic enhancement on 2.4-mm-thick slices, which had moderate reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.473). There was no significant difference in measurements of blood flow, blood volume by either method, times to the start and peak of pancreatic enhancement, or permeability between slice thicknesses.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results supported that a thin slice thickness of 2.4 mm can be used for assessment of pancreatic perfusion variables in healthy dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of slice thickness on CT perfusion analysis of the pancreas in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

12 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

After precontrast CT scans, CT perfusion scans of the pancreatic body were performed every second for 30 seconds by sequential CT scanning after injection of contrast medium (iohexol; 300 mg of 1/kg) at a rate of 3 mL/s. Each dog underwent CT perfusion scans twice in a crossover-design study with 2 different slice thicknesses (2.4 and 4.8 mm). Computed tomographic pancreatic perfusion variables, including blood flow, blood volume determined with the maximum slope model, times to the start of enhancement and peak enhancement, permeability, and blood volume determined by Patlak plot analysis, were measured independently by 2 reviewers. The CT perfusion variables were compared between slice thicknesses. Interoperator reproducibility was determined by ICC calculation.

RESULTS

Interoperator reproducibility of CT perfusion variable measurements was excellent on 2.4-mm (mean ± SD ICC, 0.81 ± 0.17) and 4.8-mm (0.90 ± 0.07) slice thicknesses, except for time to peak pancreatic enhancement on 2.4-mm-thick slices, which had moderate reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.473). There was no significant difference in measurements of blood flow, blood volume by either method, times to the start and peak of pancreatic enhancement, or permeability between slice thicknesses.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results supported that a thin slice thickness of 2.4 mm can be used for assessment of pancreatic perfusion variables in healthy dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Choi (imsono@chonnam.ac.kr).