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Efficacy of sodium iodide for prevention of respiratory disease in preweaned dairy calves

Lisa Gamsjäger Mag Med Vet1, Brian L. Vander Ley DVM, PhD3, Heather K. Knych DVM, PhD4, Gary R. McArthur DVM5, and Meera C. Heller DVM, PhD2
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  • 1 1William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 2Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 3Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, University of Nebraska, Clay Center, NE 68933.
  • | 4 4K. L. Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 5 5Swinging Udders Vet Services, Elk Grove, CA 95624.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the pharmacokinetics of sodium iodide (NaI) following oral administration to preweaned dairy calves, and to assess the efficacy of NaI for prevention of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in preweaned calves at a commercial calf-raising facility.

ANIMALS

434 healthy preweaned dairy calves.

PROCEDURES

In the first of 2 experimental trials, each of 7 calves received NaI (20 mg/kg, PO) once. Blood and nasal fluid samples were collected at predetermined times before (baseline) and for 72 hours after NaI administration for determination of iodine concentrations. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental analysis. In the second trial, 427 calves at a calf-raising facility were randomly assigned to receive NaI (20 mg/kg, PO, 2 doses 72 hours apart; n = 211) or serve as untreated controls (216). Health outcomes were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS

For all 7 calves in the pharmacokinetic trial, the iodine concentration in both serum and nasal fluid samples was significantly increased from the baseline concentration and exceeded the presumed therapeutic iodine concentration (6.35 μg/mL) throughout the sampling period. In the on-farm trial, the odds of being treated for BRD before weaning for NaI-treated calves were twice those for control calves (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 to 3.00).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that, although oral administration of NaI (20 mg/kg) to preweaned dairy calves achieved iodine concentrations presumed to be effective in both serum and nasal fluid, it was not effective for prevention of BRD in preweaned calves at a commercial calf-raising facility.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the pharmacokinetics of sodium iodide (NaI) following oral administration to preweaned dairy calves, and to assess the efficacy of NaI for prevention of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in preweaned calves at a commercial calf-raising facility.

ANIMALS

434 healthy preweaned dairy calves.

PROCEDURES

In the first of 2 experimental trials, each of 7 calves received NaI (20 mg/kg, PO) once. Blood and nasal fluid samples were collected at predetermined times before (baseline) and for 72 hours after NaI administration for determination of iodine concentrations. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental analysis. In the second trial, 427 calves at a calf-raising facility were randomly assigned to receive NaI (20 mg/kg, PO, 2 doses 72 hours apart; n = 211) or serve as untreated controls (216). Health outcomes were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS

For all 7 calves in the pharmacokinetic trial, the iodine concentration in both serum and nasal fluid samples was significantly increased from the baseline concentration and exceeded the presumed therapeutic iodine concentration (6.35 μg/mL) throughout the sampling period. In the on-farm trial, the odds of being treated for BRD before weaning for NaI-treated calves were twice those for control calves (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 to 3.00).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that, although oral administration of NaI (20 mg/kg) to preweaned dairy calves achieved iodine concentrations presumed to be effective in both serum and nasal fluid, it was not effective for prevention of BRD in preweaned calves at a commercial calf-raising facility.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Gamsjäger's present address is the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada.

Address correspondence to Dr. Heller (mcheller@ucdavis.edu).