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Investigation for correction formulas on the basis of packed cell volume for blood glucose concentration measurements obtained with portable glucometers when used in rabbits

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  • 1 1Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 2Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine effects of PCV on blood glucose (BG) concentration measurements obtained with a human portable blood glucometer (HPBG) and a veterinary portable blood glucometer (VPBG) on canine (cVPBG) and feline (fVPBG) settings (test methods) when used in rabbits and to develop correction formulas to mitigate effects of PCV on such measurements.

SAMPLE

48 resuspended blood samples with known PVCs (range, 0% [plasma] to 92% [plasma and packed RBCs]) from 6 healthy research rabbits (experimental sample set) and 252 historic measurements of BG concentration and PCV in 84 client-owned rabbits evaluated at a veterinary hospital (validation data set).

PROCEDURES

Duplicate measurements of BG concentration with each test method and of PCV were obtained for each sample in the experimental sample set, and the mean results for each variable for each test method and sample were compared with results from a clinical laboratory analyzer (reference method) used to determine the true BG concentration for each sample. Mean ± SD differences in measurements between the reference and test methods were calculated. Linear regression and modified Clarke error grid analysis were used to develop correction formulas for the test methods given known PCVs, and these formulas were evaluated on the validation data set with linear regression and a modified Clarke error grid.

RESULTS

Blood glucose concentrations were falsely low for cVPBG and fVPBG used on samples with PCV < 31% and were falsely high for all test methods used on samples with PCV > 43%. Compared with original measurements, formula-corrected measurements overall had better agreement with reference method measurements for the experimental sample set; however, only the formula-corrected HPBG measurements had improved agreement for the validation data set.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that, in rabbits, HPBG measurements had improved accuracy with the use of the correction formula HPBG measurement of BG concentration + ([0.75 × PCV] − 15); however, the correction formulas did not improve the accuracy of VPBG measurements, and we believe that neither the cVPBG nor fVPBG should be used in rabbits.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine effects of PCV on blood glucose (BG) concentration measurements obtained with a human portable blood glucometer (HPBG) and a veterinary portable blood glucometer (VPBG) on canine (cVPBG) and feline (fVPBG) settings (test methods) when used in rabbits and to develop correction formulas to mitigate effects of PCV on such measurements.

SAMPLE

48 resuspended blood samples with known PVCs (range, 0% [plasma] to 92% [plasma and packed RBCs]) from 6 healthy research rabbits (experimental sample set) and 252 historic measurements of BG concentration and PCV in 84 client-owned rabbits evaluated at a veterinary hospital (validation data set).

PROCEDURES

Duplicate measurements of BG concentration with each test method and of PCV were obtained for each sample in the experimental sample set, and the mean results for each variable for each test method and sample were compared with results from a clinical laboratory analyzer (reference method) used to determine the true BG concentration for each sample. Mean ± SD differences in measurements between the reference and test methods were calculated. Linear regression and modified Clarke error grid analysis were used to develop correction formulas for the test methods given known PCVs, and these formulas were evaluated on the validation data set with linear regression and a modified Clarke error grid.

RESULTS

Blood glucose concentrations were falsely low for cVPBG and fVPBG used on samples with PCV < 31% and were falsely high for all test methods used on samples with PCV > 43%. Compared with original measurements, formula-corrected measurements overall had better agreement with reference method measurements for the experimental sample set; however, only the formula-corrected HPBG measurements had improved agreement for the validation data set.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that, in rabbits, HPBG measurements had improved accuracy with the use of the correction formula HPBG measurement of BG concentration + ([0.75 × PCV] − 15); however, the correction formulas did not improve the accuracy of VPBG measurements, and we believe that neither the cVPBG nor fVPBG should be used in rabbits.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Cutler's present address is the Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, LA 70118.

Address correspondence to Dr. Cutler (dccaleb@gmail.com).