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Evaluation of various carbon dioxide laser settings on the time and number of laser beam passes required to make a full-thickness skin incision and amount of laser-induced tissue artifact

Lori M. Agulian DVM1, F. A. Mann DVM, MS1, John R. Middleton DVM, PhD1, and Dae Y. Kim DVM, PhD2
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  • 1 1Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 2Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the time and number of laser beam passes required to make full-thickness skin incisions and extent of laser-induced tissue artifacts following use of a CO2 laser at various settings.

SAMPLE

24 skin specimens from six 5-month-old porcine carcasses.

PROCEDURES

4 full-thickness skin specimens were harvested from the flank regions of each carcass within 30 minutes after euthanasia and randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. Three 5-cm-long incisions were made in each specimen with a CO2 laser (beam diameter, 0.4 mm) set to deliver a continuous wave of energy alone (groups 1 and 2) or in superpulse mode (groups 3 and 4) at 10 (groups 1 and 3) or 20 (groups 2 and 4) W of power. The time and number of passes required to achieve a full-thickness incision were recorded, and extent of laser-induced tissue artifact (as determined by histologic evaluation) was compared among the 4 groups.

RESULTS

Mean time required to make a full-thickness skin incision for groups 2 and 4 (power, 20 W) was significantly less than that for groups 1 and 3 (power, 10 W). Mean number of passes was lowest for group 2 (continuous wave at 20 W). Extent of laser-induced tissue artifact was greatest for group 4 (superpulse mode at 20 W).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results provided preliminary information regarding use of CO2 lasers to make skin incisions in veterinary patients. In vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the effect of various CO2 laser settings on tissue healing and patient outcome.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the time and number of laser beam passes required to make full-thickness skin incisions and extent of laser-induced tissue artifacts following use of a CO2 laser at various settings.

SAMPLE

24 skin specimens from six 5-month-old porcine carcasses.

PROCEDURES

4 full-thickness skin specimens were harvested from the flank regions of each carcass within 30 minutes after euthanasia and randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. Three 5-cm-long incisions were made in each specimen with a CO2 laser (beam diameter, 0.4 mm) set to deliver a continuous wave of energy alone (groups 1 and 2) or in superpulse mode (groups 3 and 4) at 10 (groups 1 and 3) or 20 (groups 2 and 4) W of power. The time and number of passes required to achieve a full-thickness incision were recorded, and extent of laser-induced tissue artifact (as determined by histologic evaluation) was compared among the 4 groups.

RESULTS

Mean time required to make a full-thickness skin incision for groups 2 and 4 (power, 20 W) was significantly less than that for groups 1 and 3 (power, 10 W). Mean number of passes was lowest for group 2 (continuous wave at 20 W). Extent of laser-induced tissue artifact was greatest for group 4 (superpulse mode at 20 W).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results provided preliminary information regarding use of CO2 lasers to make skin incisions in veterinary patients. In vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the effect of various CO2 laser settings on tissue healing and patient outcome.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Agulian's present address is Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

Address correspondence to Dr. Agulian (lori.agulian@gmail.com).