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Effect of packed red blood cell transfusion on thromboelastographic tracings in dogs with naturally occurring anemia

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  • 1 1Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 2 2Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effect of packed RBC (pRBC) transfusion on thromboelastographic (TEG) tracings in dogs with naturally occurring anemia.

ANIMALS

22 clinically anemic dogs that received a pRBC transfusion.

PROCEDURES

For each dog, a blood sample was collected before and within 3 hours after completion of the pRBC transfusion for a CBC, nonactivated TEG analysis, and measurement of blood viscosity. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare CBC, viscosity, and TEG variables between pretransfusion and posttransfusion blood samples. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the effects of pretransfusion-posttransfusion changes in Hct, WBC count, and platelet count on changes in TEG variables.

RESULTS

Median posttransfusion Hct (21%; range, 13% to 34%) was significantly greater than the median pretransfusion Hct (12.5%; range, 7% to 29%). Packed RBC transfusion was associated with a median increase in Hct of 6.2% (range, 1.2% to 13%). Maximum amplitude significantly decreased from 74.9 to 73.8 mm and clot strength significantly decreased from 14,906 to 14,119 dynes/s after pRBC transfusion. Blood viscosity significantly increased, whereas platelet and WBC counts significantly decreased after transfusion. Multivariable linear regression revealed that pretransfusion-posttransfusion changes in Hct, WBC count, and platelet count were not associated with changes in TEG variables.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that pRBC transfusion had only small effects on the TEG tracings of hemodynamically stable dogs. Therefore, large changes in TEG tracings following pRBC transfusion are unlikely to be the result of the transfusion and should be investigated further.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effect of packed RBC (pRBC) transfusion on thromboelastographic (TEG) tracings in dogs with naturally occurring anemia.

ANIMALS

22 clinically anemic dogs that received a pRBC transfusion.

PROCEDURES

For each dog, a blood sample was collected before and within 3 hours after completion of the pRBC transfusion for a CBC, nonactivated TEG analysis, and measurement of blood viscosity. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare CBC, viscosity, and TEG variables between pretransfusion and posttransfusion blood samples. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the effects of pretransfusion-posttransfusion changes in Hct, WBC count, and platelet count on changes in TEG variables.

RESULTS

Median posttransfusion Hct (21%; range, 13% to 34%) was significantly greater than the median pretransfusion Hct (12.5%; range, 7% to 29%). Packed RBC transfusion was associated with a median increase in Hct of 6.2% (range, 1.2% to 13%). Maximum amplitude significantly decreased from 74.9 to 73.8 mm and clot strength significantly decreased from 14,906 to 14,119 dynes/s after pRBC transfusion. Blood viscosity significantly increased, whereas platelet and WBC counts significantly decreased after transfusion. Multivariable linear regression revealed that pretransfusion-posttransfusion changes in Hct, WBC count, and platelet count were not associated with changes in TEG variables.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that pRBC transfusion had only small effects on the TEG tracings of hemodynamically stable dogs. Therefore, large changes in TEG tracings following pRBC transfusion are unlikely to be the result of the transfusion and should be investigated further.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Brooks' present address is the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Dr. Couto's present address is Couto Veterinary Consultants, Hilliard, OH 43026.

Dr. Guillaumin's present address is the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Address correspondence to Dr. Guillaumin (julien.guillaumin@colostate.edu).