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Comparison of the efficacy and duration of desensitization of oral structures following injection of various volumes of a lidocaine-bupivacaine mixture via an infraorbital approach in dogs

Peter J. Pascoe BVSc1 and Amandeep S. Chohan BVSc&AH, MVSc, MS1
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  • 1 1Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the efficacy and duration of desensitization of oral structures following injection of various volumes of lidocaine-bupivacaine via an infraorbital approach in dogs.

ANIMALS

6 healthy adult hound-type dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized crossover study, each dog received 1, 2, and 3 mL of a 2% lidocaine-0.5% bupivacaine mixture (50:50 vol/vol) injected within and near the caudal aspect of the infraorbital canal with a 14-day washout period between treatments. Dogs were anesthetized, and each treatment was administered through a 22-gauge, 4.5-cm-long catheter, which was fully inserted through and then withdrawn 2 cm to the caudal aspect of the infraorbital canal. The reflex-evoked motor potential was measured for the maxillary canine tooth (MC), fourth premolar tooth (MPM4), second molar tooth (MM2), and hard palate mucosa ipsilateral to the injected treatment and for the contralateral MC (control) at predetermined times before and for 6 hours after treatment administration or until the block was no longer effective. For each oral structure, the proportion of dogs with desensitization (efficacy) and time to onset and duration of desensitization were compared among the 3 treatments (injectate volumes).

RESULTS

Treatment was not associated with efficacy, time to onset, or duration of desensitization. Regardless of treatment, MC and MPM4 were more frequently desensitized and mean durations of desensitization for MC and MPM4 were longer, compared with those for MM2 and the hard palate.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The volume of local anesthetic used for an infraorbital nerve block had no effect on block efficacy or duration.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Chohan (aschohan@ucdavis.edu).