• 1. Mader D, Rudloff E. Emergency and critical care. In: Mader D, ed. Reptile medicine and surgery. 2nd ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2006;533548.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Prezant RM, Jarchow JL. Indications and applications of clinical techniques in the green iguana. Semin Avian Exot Pet Med 1997;6:6374.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Raphael B. Rehabilitation medicine of confiscated turtles. In: Miller RE, Laberski N, Calle PP, eds. Fowler's zoo and wild animal medicine current therapy. Vol 9. St Louis: Elsevier, 2019;404411.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Carpenter J, Klaphake E, Gibbons PM. Reptile formulary and laboratory normals. In: Mader DR, Divers SJ, eds. Current therapy in reptile medicine and surgery. St Louis: Elsevier, 2014;382410.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Camacho M, del Pino Quintana M, Calabuig P, et al. Acid-base and plasma biochemical changes using crystalloid fluids in stranded juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). PLoS One 2015;10:e0132217.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Parkinson LA, Mans C. Effects of furosemide administration to water-deprived inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Am J Vet Res 2018;79:12041208.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. DiBartola S, Willard MD. Disorders of phosphorus: hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia. In: DiBartola SP, ed. Fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders in small animal practice. 4th ed. St Louis: WB Saunders, 2012;195211.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Dallwig R, Mitchell MA, Acierno MJ. Determination of plasma osmolality and agreement between measured and calculated values in healthy adult bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). J Herpetol Med Surg 2010;20:6973.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Plummer MP, Bellomo R, Cousins CE, et al. Dysglycaemia in the critically ill and the interaction of chronic and acute glycaemia with mortality. Intensive Care Med 2014;40:973980.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10. Lleva RR, Inzucchi SE. Hospital management of hyperglycemia. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes 2011;18:110118.

  • 11. Marik PE. Tight glycemic control in acutely ill patients: low evidence of benefit, high evidence of harm! Intensive Care Med 2016;42:14751477.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12. Guillaumin J, DiBartola SP. Disorders of sodium and water homeostasis. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2017;47:293312.

  • 13. Gillespie Í, Rosenstein PG, Hughes D. Update: clinical use of plasma lactate. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2017;47:325342.

  • 14. Abbott LM, Kovacic J. The pharmacologic spectrum of furosemide. J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2008;18:2639.

  • 15. Bradshaw S. Osmoregulation in lizards. In: Cloudsley-Thompson J, ed. Homeostasis in desert reptiles. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1997;3942.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Evaluation of subcutaneously administered electrolyte solutions in experimentally dehydrated inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps)

Lily A. Parkinson DVM1 and Christoph Mans Dr Med Vet1
View More View Less
  • 1 1Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effects of 3 electrolyte solutions administered SC to experimentally dehydrated inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

ANIMALS

9 inland bearded dragons.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized, complete crossover study, experimental dehydration was induced by means of furosemide (10 mg/kg, SC, q 12 h for 4 doses), and then lactated Ringer solution, Plasma-Lyte A, or reptile Ringer solution (RRS; 1:1 mixture of 5% dextrose solution and isotonic crystalloid solution) was administered SC in a single 50-mL/kg dose in 3 treatments sessions separated by a minimum of 14 days. Food and water were withheld during treatment sessions. Plasma biochemical values, PCV, blood total solids and lactate concentrations, and plasma osmolarity were measured prior to (baseline) and 4 and 24 hours after fluid administration.

RESULTS

Administration of RRS resulted in severe hyperglycemia (mean ± SD plasma glucose concentration, 420 ± 62 mg/dL), compared with baseline values (190 ± 32 mg/dL), and this hyperglycemia persisted for at least 24 hours. It also resulted in significant reductions in plasma osmolarity and sodium and phosphorus concentrations, which were not observed after administration of the other 2 solutions. Administration of lactated Ringer solution caused no significant increase in blood lactate concentration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The changes in plasma glucose, sodium, and phosphorus concentrations and plasma osmolarity observed after SC administration of a single dose of RRS suggested this type of electrolyte solution should not be used for rehydration of bearded dragons. Rather, lactated Ringer solution or Plasma-Lyte A should be considered instead.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Parkinson's present address is the College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Address correspondence to Dr. Mans (christoph.mans@wisc.edu).