• 1. Coates JR. Intervertebral disk disease. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2000;30:77110.

  • 2. Sharp N, Wheeler S. Patient examination. In: Sharp N, Wheeler S, eds. Small animal spinal disorders: diagnosis and surgery. 2nd ed. St Louis: Mosby Elsevier, 2005;1933.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Kimura J. F-wave in the evaluation of neurologic disorders: a comment. Muscle Nerve 1978;1:250252.

  • 4. Fisher MA. AAEM Minimonograph #13: H reflexes and F waves: physiology and clinical indications. Muscle Nerve 1992;15:12231233.

  • 5. Mesrati F, Vecchierini MF. F-waves: neurophysiology and clinical value. Neurophysiol Clin 2004;34:217243.

  • 6. Machida M, Sato K, Asai T, et al. An experimental study of the F-wave in the dog: effects of spasticity and central muscle relaxant. Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 1983;23:353360.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Okuno S, Kobayashi T, Orito K. F-wave latency and F-wave conduction velocity for the tibial nerve in clinically normal dogs. Am J Vet Res 2002;63:12621264.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Northington JW, Brown MJ. Acute canine idiopathic polyneuropathy. A Guillain-Barré-like syndrome in dogs. J Neurol Sci 1982;56:259273.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Cuddon PA. Electrophysiologic assessment of acute polyradiculoneuropathy in dogs: comparison with Guillain-Barre syndrome in people. J Vet Intern Med 1998;12:294303.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10. Mizisin AP, Shelton GD, Burgers ML, et al. Neurological complications associated with spontaneously occurring feline diabetes mellitus. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 2002; 61:872884.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

F-wave parameters for the tibial nerve in Miniature Dachshunds with and without naturally acquired thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation

Seiichi Okuno DVM, PhD1,2 and Kensuke Orito DVM, PhD1
View More View Less
  • 1 1Laboratory of Physiology II, Department of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Kanagawa 252-5201, Japan.
  • | 2 2ACORN Veterinary Clinic of Neurology, Isesaki, Gunma 372-0814, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine values of F-wave parameters for the tibial nerve in clinically normal Miniature Dachshunds and those with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH).

ANIMALS

53 Miniature Dachshunds (10 clinically normal and 43 with various clinical grades of thoracolumbar IVDH).

PROCEDURES

F-waves were elicited in the interosseous muscles of 1 hind limb in each dog by stimulation of the tibial nerve. F-wave parameters were measured for 32 stimuli/dog, and mean values were calculated. Linear regression was performed to assess correlations between F-wave parameters and clinical severity of IVDH.

RESULTS

For clinically normal dogs, mean ± SD values of shortest F-wave latency, mean F-wave conduction velocity, mean F-wave duration, and ratio of the mean F-wave amplitude to M response amplitude were 8.6 ± 0.6 milliseconds, 83.7 ± 6.1 m/s, 6.6 ± 1.5 milliseconds, and 9.8 ± 8.5%, respectively. F-wave persistence was 100%. Mean F-wave duration was positively correlated with clinical grade of IVDH. Linear regression yielded the following regression equation: F-wave duration (milliseconds) = 6.0 + 2.7 × IVDH grade. One dog with grade 2 IVDH had a mean F-wave duration shorter than that of all 5 dogs with grade 1 IVDH; 1 dog with grade 3 IVDH had a longer duration than that of all 10 dogs with grade 4 IVDH.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Mean F-wave duration was correlated with the severity of inhibitory motor tract dysfunction in the spinal cord of dogs. F-wave examination may be useful for objective functional evaluation of upper motor neurons in the spinal cord.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine values of F-wave parameters for the tibial nerve in clinically normal Miniature Dachshunds and those with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH).

ANIMALS

53 Miniature Dachshunds (10 clinically normal and 43 with various clinical grades of thoracolumbar IVDH).

PROCEDURES

F-waves were elicited in the interosseous muscles of 1 hind limb in each dog by stimulation of the tibial nerve. F-wave parameters were measured for 32 stimuli/dog, and mean values were calculated. Linear regression was performed to assess correlations between F-wave parameters and clinical severity of IVDH.

RESULTS

For clinically normal dogs, mean ± SD values of shortest F-wave latency, mean F-wave conduction velocity, mean F-wave duration, and ratio of the mean F-wave amplitude to M response amplitude were 8.6 ± 0.6 milliseconds, 83.7 ± 6.1 m/s, 6.6 ± 1.5 milliseconds, and 9.8 ± 8.5%, respectively. F-wave persistence was 100%. Mean F-wave duration was positively correlated with clinical grade of IVDH. Linear regression yielded the following regression equation: F-wave duration (milliseconds) = 6.0 + 2.7 × IVDH grade. One dog with grade 2 IVDH had a mean F-wave duration shorter than that of all 5 dogs with grade 1 IVDH; 1 dog with grade 3 IVDH had a longer duration than that of all 10 dogs with grade 4 IVDH.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Mean F-wave duration was correlated with the severity of inhibitory motor tract dysfunction in the spinal cord of dogs. F-wave examination may be useful for objective functional evaluation of upper motor neurons in the spinal cord.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Orito (oritok@azabu-u.ac.jp).