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Comparison of topically administered 0.05% difluprednate and 1% prednisolone acetate for inhibition of aqueocentesis-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier in healthy dogs

Rachel A. Allbaugh DVM, MS1, Rita F. Wehrman DVM, MS1, and Lionel Sebbag DVM1
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the efficacy of 0.05% difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion and 1% prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension for controlling aqueocentesis-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

34 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were allocated to 5 groups (6 to 8 dogs/group) to receive 0.05% difluprednate, 1% prednisolone acetate, or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) in both eyes 2 or 4 times daily. Eye drops were administered topically for 5 consecutive days. Anterior chamber paracentesis (aqueocentesis) was performed in 1 eye on the third day. Automated fluorophotometry was performed immediately before and 20 minutes and 24 and 48 hours after aqueocentesis. Relative fluorescence (RF), defined as fluorescence of the eye that had undergone aqueocentesis divided by fluorescence of the contralateral eye, was calculated to help control for variation among dogs.

RESULTS

Mean RF was significantly lower at 24 hours after aqueocentesis in dogs treated twice daily with 0.05% difluprednate or 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in dogs receiving the control treatment. At 48 hours after aqueocentesis, mean RF was significantly lower in dogs treated 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in control dogs. Mean RF differed over time in dogs treated 4 times daily with 0.05% difluprednate but did not differ over time for any of the other treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

All 4 treatments were effective for reducing aqueocentesis-induced anterior uveitis in healthy dogs regardless of the drug or frequency of administration. Topical ophthalmic administration of 0.05% difluprednate may be a viable treatment option for dogs with anterior uveitis and warrants further study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the efficacy of 0.05% difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion and 1% prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension for controlling aqueocentesis-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

34 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were allocated to 5 groups (6 to 8 dogs/group) to receive 0.05% difluprednate, 1% prednisolone acetate, or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) in both eyes 2 or 4 times daily. Eye drops were administered topically for 5 consecutive days. Anterior chamber paracentesis (aqueocentesis) was performed in 1 eye on the third day. Automated fluorophotometry was performed immediately before and 20 minutes and 24 and 48 hours after aqueocentesis. Relative fluorescence (RF), defined as fluorescence of the eye that had undergone aqueocentesis divided by fluorescence of the contralateral eye, was calculated to help control for variation among dogs.

RESULTS

Mean RF was significantly lower at 24 hours after aqueocentesis in dogs treated twice daily with 0.05% difluprednate or 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in dogs receiving the control treatment. At 48 hours after aqueocentesis, mean RF was significantly lower in dogs treated 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in control dogs. Mean RF differed over time in dogs treated 4 times daily with 0.05% difluprednate but did not differ over time for any of the other treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

All 4 treatments were effective for reducing aqueocentesis-induced anterior uveitis in healthy dogs regardless of the drug or frequency of administration. Topical ophthalmic administration of 0.05% difluprednate may be a viable treatment option for dogs with anterior uveitis and warrants further study.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Wehrman's present address is Animal Eye Specialty Clinic, West Palm Beach, FL 33406.

Address correspondence to Dr. Allbaugh (allbaugh@iastate.edu).