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Impact of wearing a service vest on three-dimensional truncal motion in dogs

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  • 1 1School of Environmental, Civil, Agricultural and Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 2Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To develop a 3-D kinematic model to measure truncal motion in dogs and assess changes in truncal motion in dogs when wearing each of 2 service vests.

ANIMALS

5 adult mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES

27 reflective markers were placed on the pelvis, trunk, and scapula of each dog. Six infrared cameras were placed around a treadmill to track the location of the markers within a calibrated space. Dogs were recorded during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Local and global coordinate systems were established, and a segmental rigid-body model of the trunk was created. Dogs were then recorded while wearing a custom vest and an adjustable vest during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Range of motion of the trunk when dogs were and were not wearing vests was compared by repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

An anatomic coordinate system was established by use of markers located at T1, T13, and the xiphoid process. Range of motion of the trunk during a gait cycle did not differ significantly regardless of the day of the test for both walking and trotting gaits. Trunk motion of dogs when walking and trotting was significantly reduced when dogs were wearing a vest, compared with trunk motion when not wearing a vest.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A 3-D kinematic model for measuring truncal rotation was developed. Results indicated measurable differences in the gait of dogs when wearing each of the 2 service vests, compared with the gait when not wearing a vest.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To develop a 3-D kinematic model to measure truncal motion in dogs and assess changes in truncal motion in dogs when wearing each of 2 service vests.

ANIMALS

5 adult mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES

27 reflective markers were placed on the pelvis, trunk, and scapula of each dog. Six infrared cameras were placed around a treadmill to track the location of the markers within a calibrated space. Dogs were recorded during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Local and global coordinate systems were established, and a segmental rigid-body model of the trunk was created. Dogs were then recorded while wearing a custom vest and an adjustable vest during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Range of motion of the trunk when dogs were and were not wearing vests was compared by repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

An anatomic coordinate system was established by use of markers located at T1, T13, and the xiphoid process. Range of motion of the trunk during a gait cycle did not differ significantly regardless of the day of the test for both walking and trotting gaits. Trunk motion of dogs when walking and trotting was significantly reduced when dogs were wearing a vest, compared with trunk motion when not wearing a vest.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A 3-D kinematic model for measuring truncal rotation was developed. Results indicated measurable differences in the gait of dogs when wearing each of the 2 service vests, compared with the gait when not wearing a vest.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Budsberg (Budsberg@uga.edu).