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Effects of refrigerated storage on hemostatic stability of four canine plasma products

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  • 1 US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Joint Base San Antonio–Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess clotting times, coagulation factor activities, sterility, and thromboelastographic parameters of liquid plasma (LP), thawed fresh frozen plasma (FFP-T), and 2 novel formulations of freeze-dried plasma (FDP) stored refrigerated over 35 days.

SAMPLE

6 units of canine LP and FFP-T from a commercial animal blood bank and 5 units each of 2 formulations of canine FDP.

PROCEDURES

Prothrombin time; activated partial thromboplastin time; activities of coagulation factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII; and thromboelastographic parameters were determined for each product on days 0 (baseline), 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35. For each day, a sample of each product was also submitted for aerobic bacterial culture.

RESULTS

Small changes in coagulation factor activities and mild increased time to initial clot formation in LP and FFP-T were noted over the 35-day storage period. Activities of factor VIII in FDP1 and factor XII in FDP2 were < 50% at baseline but varied throughout. Compared with FFP-T, time to initial clot formation was increased and clot strength was preserved or increased for the FDPs throughout the study. One FDP had decreased pH, compared with other products. No plasma product yielded bacterial growth.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Liquid plasma and FFP-T would be reasonable to use when stored refrigerated for up to 35 days. Both FDP products showed variability in coagulation factor activities. Studies investigating the usefulness of these plasma products (FDPs) in dogs and the variable days of refrigerated storage (all products) are warranted. (Am J Vet Res 2020;81:964–972)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess clotting times, coagulation factor activities, sterility, and thromboelastographic parameters of liquid plasma (LP), thawed fresh frozen plasma (FFP-T), and 2 novel formulations of freeze-dried plasma (FDP) stored refrigerated over 35 days.

SAMPLE

6 units of canine LP and FFP-T from a commercial animal blood bank and 5 units each of 2 formulations of canine FDP.

PROCEDURES

Prothrombin time; activated partial thromboplastin time; activities of coagulation factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII; and thromboelastographic parameters were determined for each product on days 0 (baseline), 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35. For each day, a sample of each product was also submitted for aerobic bacterial culture.

RESULTS

Small changes in coagulation factor activities and mild increased time to initial clot formation in LP and FFP-T were noted over the 35-day storage period. Activities of factor VIII in FDP1 and factor XII in FDP2 were < 50% at baseline but varied throughout. Compared with FFP-T, time to initial clot formation was increased and clot strength was preserved or increased for the FDPs throughout the study. One FDP had decreased pH, compared with other products. No plasma product yielded bacterial growth.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Liquid plasma and FFP-T would be reasonable to use when stored refrigerated for up to 35 days. Both FDP products showed variability in coagulation factor activities. Studies investigating the usefulness of these plasma products (FDPs) in dogs and the variable days of refrigerated storage (all products) are warranted. (Am J Vet Res 2020;81:964–972)

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 170 kb)
    • Supplementary Table S2 (PDF 178 kb)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Edwards (ugadvm2006@hotmail.com).