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Blood taurine concentrations in dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency

Sarah Tayler BVetMed1, Joonbum Seo BVSc1, David J. Connolly BVetMed, PhD1, and Aarti Kathrani BVetMed, PhD1
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield AL9 7TA, England.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether blood taurine concentrations in dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) were lower than the reference interval (200 to 350 nmol/mL) or the cutoff used to indicate taurine deficiency (< 150 nmol/mL).

ANIMALS

18 dogs with clinical or presumptive subclinical EPI with residual blood samples available for taurine concentration analysis.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were classified as having clinical EPI if they had a serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentration of < 2.0 μg/L and presumptive subclinical EPI if they had a concentration of 2.0 to 5.0 μg/L. Archived, frozen blood samples stored in EDTA were submitted for measurement of taurine concentration with an automated high-performance liquid chromatography amino acid analyzer. Medical record data were examined for associations with blood taurine concentration.

RESULTS

None of the 18 dogs had a blood taurine concentration < 150 nmol/mL. Two dogs had a concentration < 200 nmol/mL. No clinical signs, physical examination findings, or serum biochemical abnormalities were associated with blood taurine concentration. Eleven of the 17 dogs for which diet histories were available were not receiving a diet that met recommendations of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Global Nutrition Committee.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A low blood taurine concentration was noted in a small subset of dogs with EPI. Additional research is needed to determine whether EPI was the primary cause of this low concentration. Findings suggested the importance of obtaining complete diet histories and ensuring dietary requirements are sufficiently met in dogs with EPI. (Am J Vet Res 2020;81:958–963)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether blood taurine concentrations in dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) were lower than the reference interval (200 to 350 nmol/mL) or the cutoff used to indicate taurine deficiency (< 150 nmol/mL).

ANIMALS

18 dogs with clinical or presumptive subclinical EPI with residual blood samples available for taurine concentration analysis.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were classified as having clinical EPI if they had a serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentration of < 2.0 μg/L and presumptive subclinical EPI if they had a concentration of 2.0 to 5.0 μg/L. Archived, frozen blood samples stored in EDTA were submitted for measurement of taurine concentration with an automated high-performance liquid chromatography amino acid analyzer. Medical record data were examined for associations with blood taurine concentration.

RESULTS

None of the 18 dogs had a blood taurine concentration < 150 nmol/mL. Two dogs had a concentration < 200 nmol/mL. No clinical signs, physical examination findings, or serum biochemical abnormalities were associated with blood taurine concentration. Eleven of the 17 dogs for which diet histories were available were not receiving a diet that met recommendations of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Global Nutrition Committee.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A low blood taurine concentration was noted in a small subset of dogs with EPI. Additional research is needed to determine whether EPI was the primary cause of this low concentration. Findings suggested the importance of obtaining complete diet histories and ensuring dietary requirements are sufficiently met in dogs with EPI. (Am J Vet Res 2020;81:958–963)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Kathrani (akathrani@rvc.ac.uk).