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Comparison of intestinal leak pressure between cadaveric canine and commercial synthetic intestinal tissue that did and did not undergo enterotomy

Penny J. Regier DVM, MS1, Mark J. Fealey DVM1, Stanley E. Kim DVM, MS1, J. Brad Case DVM, MS1, and Fernando Garcia-Pereira DVM, MVSc1
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  • 1 1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare initial leak pressure (ILP) between cadaveric canine and synthetic small intestinal segments that did and did not undergo enterotomy.

SAMPLE

Eight 8-cm grossly normal jejunal segments from 1 canine cadaver and eight 8-cm synthetic small intestinal segments.

PROCEDURES

Intestinal segments were randomly assigned to undergo enterotomy (6 cadaveric and 6 synthetic segments) or serve as untreated controls (2 cadaveric and 2 synthetic segments). For segments designated for enterotomy, a 2-cm full-thickness incision was created along the antimesenteric border. The incision was closed in a single layer with 4-0 suture in a simple continuous pattern. Leak testing was performed with intestinal segments occluded at both ends and infused with dilute dye solution (999 mL/h) until the solution was observed leaking from the suture line or serosal tearing occurred. Intraluminal pressure was continuously monitored. The ILP at construct failure was compared between cadaveric and synthetic control segments and between cadaveric and synthetic enterotomy segments.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD ILP did not differ significantly between cadaveric (345.11 ± 2.15 mm Hg) and synthetic (329.04 ± 24.69 mm Hg) control segments but was significantly greater for cadaveric enterotomy segments (60.77 ± 15.81 mm Hg), compared with synthetic enterotomy segments (15.03 ± 6.41 mm Hg).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leak testing should not be used to assess the accuracy or security of enterotomy suture lines in synthetic intestinal tissue. Synthetic intestinal tissue is best used for students to gain confidence and proficiency in performing enterotomies before performing the procedure on live animals.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Fealey's present address is Pleasant Plains Animal Hospital, Staten Island, NY 10312.

Dr. Garcia-Pereira's present address is Veterinary Anesthesia Services LLC, Jacksonville, FL 32223.

Address correspondence to Dr. Regier (pregier@ufl.edu).