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Transference of reference intervals for variables of instrumented gait analysis in walking dogs

Anastasia M. Olsen DVM, MS1, Nicolaas E. Lambrechts BVSc, MMedVet (Surgery)3, Hsin-Yi Weng BVM, MPH, PhD2, Kristine A. Kazmierczak BS, RVT1, Felix M. Duerr DVM, MS3, and Gert J. Breur DVM, PhD1
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  • 1 1Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 2 2Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 3 3Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80525.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To use the small data approach of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to evaluate the transferability of reference intervals (RIs) for kinetic variables obtained with instrumented gait analysis (IGA) in dogs from an RI-originator laboratory to another laboratory that used the same data acquisition and analytic techniques for IGA in walking dogs.

ANIMALS

27 adult client-owned dogs without evidence of lameness.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were individually walked at their preferred velocity on a pressure-sensing walkway for IGA at the Colorado State University Animal Gait Laboratory (CSU-AGL), and 6 valid trials were analyzed for each dog. The small data approach of the CLSI was then used to evaluate transferability of RIs previously established at the Purdue University Animal Gait Laboratory (PU-AGL). A linear model was used to establish weight-dependent RIs for peak vertical force (PVF).

RESULTS

Results indicated that RIs of dynamic weight distribution (DWD), DWD symmetry index, DWD coefficient of variation, PVF symmetry index, and PVF coefficient of variation were transferable from PU-AGL to CSU-AGL, whereas the weight-dependent RIs for PVF were not. Regression slopes for PVF versus body weight were greater for all limbs in dogs tested at the CSU-AGL, compared with historic results for dogs tested at the PU-AGL.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of the small data approach method of the CLSI to validate transference of RIs for IGA kinetic variables in walking dogs was simple and efficient to perform and may help facilitate clinical and research collaborations on gait analysis.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Olsen's present address is Olympia Veterinary Specialists, Olympia, WA 98501.

Address correspondence to Dr. Olsen (Natasha.Olsen@gmail.com).