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Effect of topical administration of 0.1% diclofenac sodium ophthalmic solution at four frequencies on intraocular pressure in healthy Beagles

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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80525.
  • | 2 2Department of Statistics, College of Natural Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effects of topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac on intraocular pressure (IOP) when applied at 4 frequencies to eyes of Beagles.

ANIMALS

8 ophthalmologically normal Beagles.

PROCEDURES

The study involved four 5-day experimental periods each separated by a 16-day washout period. During each period, 1 drop of 0.1% diclofenac sodium ophthalmic solution was administered to the right eye at 4 treatment frequencies (1, 2, 3, or 4 times/d); 1 drop of eyewash was administered to the left eye as a control treatment. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed on days 0 (day before first treatment) and 5 of each experimental period. Gonioscopy was performed on day 0 of the first period. The IOPs were measured at 7 am and 7 pm on days 1 through 5.

RESULTS

No abnormalities were detected during neuro-ophthalmic and ophthalmic examinations on day 0 of each experimental period. No adverse reactions to administration of diclofenac or eyewash were observed at any time point. No abnormalities were detected during ophthalmic examinations performed on day 5, and IOPs remained < 25 mm Hg in all 4 periods. No significant differences were identified between the treated and control eyes or among the 4 treatment frequencies.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac up to 4 times/d in dogs with no ophthalmic abnormalities did not significantly increase the IOP. Additional research is needed to evaluate the effect of topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac on IOP in dogs with anterior uveitis.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effects of topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac on intraocular pressure (IOP) when applied at 4 frequencies to eyes of Beagles.

ANIMALS

8 ophthalmologically normal Beagles.

PROCEDURES

The study involved four 5-day experimental periods each separated by a 16-day washout period. During each period, 1 drop of 0.1% diclofenac sodium ophthalmic solution was administered to the right eye at 4 treatment frequencies (1, 2, 3, or 4 times/d); 1 drop of eyewash was administered to the left eye as a control treatment. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed on days 0 (day before first treatment) and 5 of each experimental period. Gonioscopy was performed on day 0 of the first period. The IOPs were measured at 7 am and 7 pm on days 1 through 5.

RESULTS

No abnormalities were detected during neuro-ophthalmic and ophthalmic examinations on day 0 of each experimental period. No adverse reactions to administration of diclofenac or eyewash were observed at any time point. No abnormalities were detected during ophthalmic examinations performed on day 5, and IOPs remained < 25 mm Hg in all 4 periods. No significant differences were identified between the treated and control eyes or among the 4 treatment frequencies.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac up to 4 times/d in dogs with no ophthalmic abnormalities did not significantly increase the IOP. Additional research is needed to evaluate the effect of topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac on IOP in dogs with anterior uveitis.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Henriksen (michala.henriksen@colostate.edu).