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Use of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography at 1.5 Tesla to evaluate the intracranial arteries of 39 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy

Chieko Ishikawa DVM1, Daisuke Ito DVM, PhD1, Natsumi Tanaka DVM1, and Masato Kitagawa DVM, PhD1
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  • 1 1Laboratory of Veterinary Neurology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Bioresource Science, Nihon University, 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-0880, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess visualization of the intracranial arteries and internal carotid artery (ICA) on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images obtained at 1.5 T and to investigate factors that affect the image quality of those arteries in dogs.

ANIMALS

39 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

PROCEDURES

Each dog underwent 3-D TOF MRA, and 5 pairs of intracranial arteries, the basilar artery, and both ICAs were evaluated. Each artery was assigned an image-quality score on a scale of 0 to 3, where 0 = poor and 3 = excellent. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess whether age, body weight (BW), serum total cholesterol concentration, intracranial volume (ICV), and mean arterial pressure were significantly associated with the image quality of each vessel.

RESULTS

In all dogs, the image-quality score was 2 or 3 for the proximal middle cerebral arteries, basilar artery, and caudal aspect of the caudal communicating arteries. In some dogs, the rostral cerebellar arteries, rostral aspect of the caudal communicating arteries, and middle and rostral aspects of the ICA were poorly visualized. For various arteries, image quality was negatively associated with age and positively associated with BW and ICV.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that 3-D TOF MRA images obtained at 1.5 T did not consistently and clearly delineate the ICA and narrow or peripheral intracranial arteries of dogs; therefore, careful attention is required when such images are assessed. Patient age, BW, and ICV can also affect the image quality of some intracranial arteries on 3-D TOF MRA images. (Am J Vet Res 2019;80:480–489)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess visualization of the intracranial arteries and internal carotid artery (ICA) on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images obtained at 1.5 T and to investigate factors that affect the image quality of those arteries in dogs.

ANIMALS

39 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

PROCEDURES

Each dog underwent 3-D TOF MRA, and 5 pairs of intracranial arteries, the basilar artery, and both ICAs were evaluated. Each artery was assigned an image-quality score on a scale of 0 to 3, where 0 = poor and 3 = excellent. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess whether age, body weight (BW), serum total cholesterol concentration, intracranial volume (ICV), and mean arterial pressure were significantly associated with the image quality of each vessel.

RESULTS

In all dogs, the image-quality score was 2 or 3 for the proximal middle cerebral arteries, basilar artery, and caudal aspect of the caudal communicating arteries. In some dogs, the rostral cerebellar arteries, rostral aspect of the caudal communicating arteries, and middle and rostral aspects of the ICA were poorly visualized. For various arteries, image quality was negatively associated with age and positively associated with BW and ICV.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that 3-D TOF MRA images obtained at 1.5 T did not consistently and clearly delineate the ICA and narrow or peripheral intracranial arteries of dogs; therefore, careful attention is required when such images are assessed. Patient age, BW, and ICV can also affect the image quality of some intracranial arteries on 3-D TOF MRA images. (Am J Vet Res 2019;80:480–489)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Ito (itou.daisuke@nihon-u.ac.jp).