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Single-day and multiday repeatability of stance analysis results for dogs with hind limb lameness

Megan L. Wilson DVM, MS1, James K. Roush DVM, MS1, and Walter C. Renberg DVM, MS1
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  • 1 1Veterinary Health Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess single-day and multiday repeatability of weight distribution (stance) data obtained with a commercial analyzer for dogs with naturally occurring hind limb lameness.

ANIMALS

46 dogs (15 and 31 for single-day and multiday trials, respectively).

PROCEDURES

For single-day trials, 5 to 10 measurements/trial were collected to determine body weight (BW), weight distribution on each limb, and forelimb and hind limb symmetry indices (SIs). The dog was removed from the room and returned immediately; 5 trials were performed. For multiday trials, measurements were performed in the same manner on 2 sequential days. Data were compared among trials (single-day measurements) and between days (multiday measurements). Repeatability (correlation coefficients and Lin concordance correlation coefficients [LCCCs]) and variability (coefficients of variation [CVs]) were assessed.

RESULTS

In single-day trials, BW (r = 0.999), weight distribution on the lame hind limb (r = 0.915) and contralateral hind limb (r = 0.948), and hind limb SI (r = 0.964) were each significantly correlated among trials. In multiday trials, BW results were similar; weight distribution on the lame hind limb and contralateral hind limb and hind limb SI were each less closely but still significantly correlated between days. The LCCCs were highest for BW, weight distribution on the contralateral hind limb, and hind limb SI in single-day trials and for BW and weight bearing on the contralateral and lame hind limbs in multiday trials. The CVs were lowest for BW and highest for forelimb SI in both trial types.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The analyzer used allowed repeatable measurement of BW and weight distribution on the hind limbs of dogs with hind limb lameness. Measurement of forelimb stance variables was not repeatable in this group of dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess single-day and multiday repeatability of weight distribution (stance) data obtained with a commercial analyzer for dogs with naturally occurring hind limb lameness.

ANIMALS

46 dogs (15 and 31 for single-day and multiday trials, respectively).

PROCEDURES

For single-day trials, 5 to 10 measurements/trial were collected to determine body weight (BW), weight distribution on each limb, and forelimb and hind limb symmetry indices (SIs). The dog was removed from the room and returned immediately; 5 trials were performed. For multiday trials, measurements were performed in the same manner on 2 sequential days. Data were compared among trials (single-day measurements) and between days (multiday measurements). Repeatability (correlation coefficients and Lin concordance correlation coefficients [LCCCs]) and variability (coefficients of variation [CVs]) were assessed.

RESULTS

In single-day trials, BW (r = 0.999), weight distribution on the lame hind limb (r = 0.915) and contralateral hind limb (r = 0.948), and hind limb SI (r = 0.964) were each significantly correlated among trials. In multiday trials, BW results were similar; weight distribution on the lame hind limb and contralateral hind limb and hind limb SI were each less closely but still significantly correlated between days. The LCCCs were highest for BW, weight distribution on the contralateral hind limb, and hind limb SI in single-day trials and for BW and weight bearing on the contralateral and lame hind limbs in multiday trials. The CVs were lowest for BW and highest for forelimb SI in both trial types.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The analyzer used allowed repeatable measurement of BW and weight distribution on the hind limbs of dogs with hind limb lameness. Measurement of forelimb stance variables was not repeatable in this group of dogs.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Wilson's present address is First Coast Veterinary Specialists, 301 Jacksonville Dr, Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250.

Address correspondence to Dr. Roush (roushjk@vet.k-state.edu).