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Hepatic computed tomography and cholangiography by use of gadoxetic acid in healthy cats

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  • 1 1Unit of Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
  • | 2 2Unit of Anaesthesia, School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, and School of Life, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
  • | 3 3Unit of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate 3 doses of gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA) for hepatic CT and cholangiography in cats and to determine optimal timing for hepatobiliary image acquisition and evaluation of the contrast-enhanced hepatobiliary anatomy.

ANIMALS

6 healthy cats.

PROCEDURES

Cats were anesthetized; sequential CT scans were performed 0, 5, 25, 45, 65, and 85 minutes after IV administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA at low (0.0125 mmol/kg), medium (0.1 mmol/kg), and high (0.3 mmol/kg) doses. Hepatobiliary enhancement for each dose was objectively assessed over time and by use of a subjective semiquantitative visual assessment score.

RESULTS

No contrast-related adverse effects were detected. Each increase in dose of contrast medium resulted in a significant increase in HU across the hepatobiliary system. The liver had a significantly higher number of HU at 45 minutes, with homogenous enhancement at all doses of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced cystic and bile duct HU were significantly higher and maximal at 65 minutes. Contrast-enhanced gallbladder HU did not plateau by 85 minutes. At a high dose of contrast medium, 12 of 60 (20%) biliary tract scores indicated no enhancement, 34 (57%) indicated poor enhancement, and 14 (23%) indicated moderate enhancement. No cat had excellent enhancement of the biliary tract at any dose.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Gd-EOB-DTPA–enhanced hepatic CT and cholangiography in cats were safely performed and provided good hepatic enhancement but poor to moderate enhancement of the biliary tract. This technique may be useful for assessing the liver parenchyma in cats, but its value for assessing the biliary tract is questionable.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate 3 doses of gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA) for hepatic CT and cholangiography in cats and to determine optimal timing for hepatobiliary image acquisition and evaluation of the contrast-enhanced hepatobiliary anatomy.

ANIMALS

6 healthy cats.

PROCEDURES

Cats were anesthetized; sequential CT scans were performed 0, 5, 25, 45, 65, and 85 minutes after IV administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA at low (0.0125 mmol/kg), medium (0.1 mmol/kg), and high (0.3 mmol/kg) doses. Hepatobiliary enhancement for each dose was objectively assessed over time and by use of a subjective semiquantitative visual assessment score.

RESULTS

No contrast-related adverse effects were detected. Each increase in dose of contrast medium resulted in a significant increase in HU across the hepatobiliary system. The liver had a significantly higher number of HU at 45 minutes, with homogenous enhancement at all doses of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced cystic and bile duct HU were significantly higher and maximal at 65 minutes. Contrast-enhanced gallbladder HU did not plateau by 85 minutes. At a high dose of contrast medium, 12 of 60 (20%) biliary tract scores indicated no enhancement, 34 (57%) indicated poor enhancement, and 14 (23%) indicated moderate enhancement. No cat had excellent enhancement of the biliary tract at any dose.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Gd-EOB-DTPA–enhanced hepatic CT and cholangiography in cats were safely performed and provided good hepatic enhancement but poor to moderate enhancement of the biliary tract. This technique may be useful for assessing the liver parenchyma in cats, but its value for assessing the biliary tract is questionable.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Pilton (joanna.pilton@sydney.edu.au).