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Evaluation of liver and spleen stiffness of healthy dogs by use of two-dimensional shear wave elastography

Masahiro Tamura DVM1, Hiroshi Ohta DVM, PhD1, Khoirun Nisa DVM1, Tatsuyuki Osuga DVM, PhD2, Noboru Sasaki DVM, PhD1, Keitaro Morishita DVM, PhD2, and Mitsuyoshi Takiguchi DVM, PhD1
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  • 1 1Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0818, Japan.
  • | 2 2Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0818, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess liver and spleen stiffness in healthy dogs by use of a novel 2-D shear wave elastography (SWE) technique and to investigate the repeatability and reproducibility of the technique.

ANIMALS

8 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

2-D SWE was performed on each dog to assess liver and spleen stiffness. Repeatability (intraday variability) and reproducibility (interday variability) of 2-D SWE were investigated. For all 8 dogs, 2-D SWE was performed 3 times in 1 day (4-hour intervals) and on 3 separate days (1-week interval). Data were expressed as mean ± SD values for shear wave velocity and the Young modulus in the liver and spleen. Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were assessed for all variables.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD shear wave velocity obtained for the liver and spleen was 1.51 ± 0.08 m/s and 2.18 ± 0.27 m/s, respectively. Mean value for the Young modulus obtained for the liver and spleen was 6.93 ± 0.79 kPa and 14.66 ± 3.79 kPa, respectively. Elasticity values were significantly higher for the spleen than for the liver. Intraday and interday coefficients of variation for all variables were < 25% (range, 3.90% to 20.70%).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

2-D SWE was a feasible technique for assessing liver and spleen stiffness of healthy dogs. Future studies on the application of 2-D SWE for dogs with chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension are needed to evaluate the clinical applicability of 2-D SWE.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess liver and spleen stiffness in healthy dogs by use of a novel 2-D shear wave elastography (SWE) technique and to investigate the repeatability and reproducibility of the technique.

ANIMALS

8 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES

2-D SWE was performed on each dog to assess liver and spleen stiffness. Repeatability (intraday variability) and reproducibility (interday variability) of 2-D SWE were investigated. For all 8 dogs, 2-D SWE was performed 3 times in 1 day (4-hour intervals) and on 3 separate days (1-week interval). Data were expressed as mean ± SD values for shear wave velocity and the Young modulus in the liver and spleen. Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were assessed for all variables.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD shear wave velocity obtained for the liver and spleen was 1.51 ± 0.08 m/s and 2.18 ± 0.27 m/s, respectively. Mean value for the Young modulus obtained for the liver and spleen was 6.93 ± 0.79 kPa and 14.66 ± 3.79 kPa, respectively. Elasticity values were significantly higher for the spleen than for the liver. Intraday and interday coefficients of variation for all variables were < 25% (range, 3.90% to 20.70%).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

2-D SWE was a feasible technique for assessing liver and spleen stiffness of healthy dogs. Future studies on the application of 2-D SWE for dogs with chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension are needed to evaluate the clinical applicability of 2-D SWE.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Takiguchi (mtaki@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp).