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Development and assessment of a novel precordial lead system for accurate detection of right atrial and ventricular depolarization in dogs with various thoracic conformations

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  • 1 1Clinica Veterinaria Malpensa, Via G. Marconi, 27, 21017 Samarate, Italy.
  • | 2 2Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
  • | 3 3Ospedale Veterinario I Portoni Rossi, Via Roma, 57, 40069 Zola Predosa, Bologna, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess recording accuracy of right atrial and ventricular depolarization during 12-lead ECG when precordial lead V1 was positioned at each of 5 locations on the thorax of dogs with various thoracic conformations.

ANIMALS

60 healthy client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

20 dogs were allocated to each of 3 groups (brachymorphic, mesomorphic, or dolichomorphic) on the basis of thoracic conformation. Each dog remained unsedated and was positioned in right lateral recumbency for a series of five 12-lead surface ECGs, with V1 located adjacent to the sternum in the fifth intercostal space (ICS; control), at the costochondral junction (CCJ) of the right first ICS (1st-R), at the CCJ of the right third ICS, at the right third ICS where the thorax was the widest, and at the CCJ of the left first ICS. Electrocardiographic variables were compared among the 5 ECG tracings.

RESULTS

When V1 was at the control location, the P wave was positive for all dogs; however, consistent recording of right atrial and ventricular depolarization (ie, R wave-to-S wave ratio [R/S] < 1) occurred more frequently for brachymorphic dogs (16/20) than for dolichomorphic (7/20) and mesomorphic (6/20) dogs. When V1 was at the 1st-R location, the P wave was negative for most dogs, and R/S was < 1 for the majority of dogs in the brachymorphic (19/20), mesomorphic (17/20), and dolichomorphic (16/20) groups. The median R/S for V1 at the 1st-R location was significantly lower than that for the other 4 V1 locations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that placement of V1 at the 1st-R location provided correct evaluation of right atrial and ventricular depolarization in most dogs regardless of thoracic conformation.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess recording accuracy of right atrial and ventricular depolarization during 12-lead ECG when precordial lead V1 was positioned at each of 5 locations on the thorax of dogs with various thoracic conformations.

ANIMALS

60 healthy client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

20 dogs were allocated to each of 3 groups (brachymorphic, mesomorphic, or dolichomorphic) on the basis of thoracic conformation. Each dog remained unsedated and was positioned in right lateral recumbency for a series of five 12-lead surface ECGs, with V1 located adjacent to the sternum in the fifth intercostal space (ICS; control), at the costochondral junction (CCJ) of the right first ICS (1st-R), at the CCJ of the right third ICS, at the right third ICS where the thorax was the widest, and at the CCJ of the left first ICS. Electrocardiographic variables were compared among the 5 ECG tracings.

RESULTS

When V1 was at the control location, the P wave was positive for all dogs; however, consistent recording of right atrial and ventricular depolarization (ie, R wave-to-S wave ratio [R/S] < 1) occurred more frequently for brachymorphic dogs (16/20) than for dolichomorphic (7/20) and mesomorphic (6/20) dogs. When V1 was at the 1st-R location, the P wave was negative for most dogs, and R/S was < 1 for the majority of dogs in the brachymorphic (19/20), mesomorphic (17/20), and dolichomorphic (16/20) groups. The median R/S for V1 at the 1st-R location was significantly lower than that for the other 4 V1 locations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that placement of V1 at the 1st-R location provided correct evaluation of right atrial and ventricular depolarization in most dogs regardless of thoracic conformation.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Santilli (rasantil@tin.it).