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Effect on urine specific gravity of the addition of glucose to urine samples of dogs and cats

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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effects of the addition of glucose to dog and cat urine on urine specific gravity (USG) and determine whether glucosuria affects assessment of renal concentrating ability.

SAMPLE

Urine samples from 102 dogs and 59 cats.

PROCEDURES

Urine for each species was pooled to create samples with various USGs. Glucose was added to an aliquot of each USG pool (final concentration, 2,400 mg/dL), and serial dilutions of the glucose-containing aliquot were created for each pool. The USG then was measured in all samples. The difference in USG attributable to addition of glucose was calculated by subtracting the USG of the unaltered sample from the USG of the sample after the addition of glucose. The relationship between the difference in USG and the USG of the unaltered, undiluted sample was evaluated by the use of linear regression analysis.

RESULTS

Addition of glucose to urine samples increased the USG. There was a significant relationship between USG of the undiluted sample and the difference in USG when glucose was added to obtain concentrations of 300, 600, 1,200, and 2,400 mg/dL in canine urine and concentrations of 600, 1,200, and 2,400 mg/dL in feline urine. The more concentrated the urine before the addition of glucose, the less change there was in the USG. Changes in USG attributable to addition of glucose were not clinically important.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Substantial glucosuria resulted in minimal alterations in specific gravity of canine and feline urine samples. Thus, USG can be used to assess renal concentrating ability even in samples with glucosuria.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effects of the addition of glucose to dog and cat urine on urine specific gravity (USG) and determine whether glucosuria affects assessment of renal concentrating ability.

SAMPLE

Urine samples from 102 dogs and 59 cats.

PROCEDURES

Urine for each species was pooled to create samples with various USGs. Glucose was added to an aliquot of each USG pool (final concentration, 2,400 mg/dL), and serial dilutions of the glucose-containing aliquot were created for each pool. The USG then was measured in all samples. The difference in USG attributable to addition of glucose was calculated by subtracting the USG of the unaltered sample from the USG of the sample after the addition of glucose. The relationship between the difference in USG and the USG of the unaltered, undiluted sample was evaluated by the use of linear regression analysis.

RESULTS

Addition of glucose to urine samples increased the USG. There was a significant relationship between USG of the undiluted sample and the difference in USG when glucose was added to obtain concentrations of 300, 600, 1,200, and 2,400 mg/dL in canine urine and concentrations of 600, 1,200, and 2,400 mg/dL in feline urine. The more concentrated the urine before the addition of glucose, the less change there was in the USG. Changes in USG attributable to addition of glucose were not clinically important.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Substantial glucosuria resulted in minimal alterations in specific gravity of canine and feline urine samples. Thus, USG can be used to assess renal concentrating ability even in samples with glucosuria.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Botsford's present address is Atlantic Veterinary Internal Medicine and Oncology, 10000 Old Columbia Rd, Columbia, MD 21046.

Address correspondence to Dr. Behrend (behreen@auburn.edu).