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In vitro effect of 20% N-acetylcysteine on the viscosity of normal canine bile

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.
  • | 5 Department of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.
  • | 6 Department of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the in vitro effect of 20% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the viscosity of normal canine bile.

ANIMALS Bile samples obtained from 10 adult dogs euthanized for reasons unrelated to biliary disease.

PROCEDURES Each sample was centrifuged to remove particulates, then divided into 3 aliquots. One aliquot remained untreated (control). Each of the other aliquots was diluted 1:4 with 20% NAC or sterile water. The viscosity of all samples was measured with a rotational viscometer at 25°C. Viscosity of control samples was measured immediately after centrifugation and at 1 and 24 hours after treatment application to the diluted samples. Viscosity of diluted samples was measured at 1 and 24 hours after treatment application.

RESULTS Mean viscosity differed significantly among the 3 groups at both 1 and 24 hours after treatment application. Relative to control samples, the addition of NAC and sterile water decreased the viscosity by approximately 3.35 mPa·s (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58 to 5.12 mPa·s) and 2.74 mPa·s (95% CI, 1.33 to 4.14 mPa·s), respectively. Mean viscosity of the NAC-treated samples was approximately 0.61 mPa·s (95% CI, 0.21 to 1.01 mPa·s) less than that for the sterile water–treated samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that in vitro dilution of canine bile 1:4 with 20% NAC significantly decreased the viscosity of the resulting mixture. Further research is necessary to determine whether NAC is a safe and effective noninvasive treatment for dogs with persistent biliary sludge or gallbladder mucoceles.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the in vitro effect of 20% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the viscosity of normal canine bile.

ANIMALS Bile samples obtained from 10 adult dogs euthanized for reasons unrelated to biliary disease.

PROCEDURES Each sample was centrifuged to remove particulates, then divided into 3 aliquots. One aliquot remained untreated (control). Each of the other aliquots was diluted 1:4 with 20% NAC or sterile water. The viscosity of all samples was measured with a rotational viscometer at 25°C. Viscosity of control samples was measured immediately after centrifugation and at 1 and 24 hours after treatment application to the diluted samples. Viscosity of diluted samples was measured at 1 and 24 hours after treatment application.

RESULTS Mean viscosity differed significantly among the 3 groups at both 1 and 24 hours after treatment application. Relative to control samples, the addition of NAC and sterile water decreased the viscosity by approximately 3.35 mPa·s (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58 to 5.12 mPa·s) and 2.74 mPa·s (95% CI, 1.33 to 4.14 mPa·s), respectively. Mean viscosity of the NAC-treated samples was approximately 0.61 mPa·s (95% CI, 0.21 to 1.01 mPa·s) less than that for the sterile water–treated samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that in vitro dilution of canine bile 1:4 with 20% NAC significantly decreased the viscosity of the resulting mixture. Further research is necessary to determine whether NAC is a safe and effective noninvasive treatment for dogs with persistent biliary sludge or gallbladder mucoceles.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Townsend (katy.townsend@oregonstate.edu).