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Use of a modified passive leg-raising maneuver to predict fluid responsiveness during experimental induction and correction of hypovolemia in healthy isoflurane-anesthetized pigs

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  • 1 Department of Comparative, Diagnostic, and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608.
  • | 2 Capital Veterinary Specialists, 3001 Hartley Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32257.
  • | 3 Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a modified passive leg-raising maneuver (PLRM) to predict fluid responsiveness during experimental induction and correction of hypovolemia in isoflurane-anesthetized pigs.

ANIMALS 6 healthy male Landrace pigs.

PROCEDURES Pigs were anesthetized with isoflurane, positioned in dorsal recumbency, and instrumented. Following induction of a neuromuscular blockade, pigs were mechanically ventilated throughout 5 sequential experimental stages during which the blood volume was manipulated so that subjects transitioned from normovolemia (baseline) to hypovolemia (blood volume depletion, 20% and 40%), back to normovolemia, and then to hypervolemia. During each stage, hemodynamic variables were measured before and 3 minutes after a PLRM and 1 minute after the pelvic limbs were returned to their original position. The PLRM consisted of raising the pelvic limbs and caudal portion of the abdomen to a 15° angle relative to the horizontal plane.

RESULTS Hemodynamic variables did not vary in response to the PLRM when pigs were normovolemic or hypervolemic. When pigs were hypovolemic, the PLRM resulted in a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease in plethysomographic variability index and pulse pressure variation. When the pelvic limbs were returned to their original position, cardiac output and pulse pressure variation rapidly returned to their pre-PLRM values, but the plethysomographic variability index did not.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested a modified PLRM might be useful for identification of hemodynamically unstable animals that are likely to respond to fluid therapy. Further research is necessary to validate the described PLRM for prediction of fluid responsiveness in clinically ill animals.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a modified passive leg-raising maneuver (PLRM) to predict fluid responsiveness during experimental induction and correction of hypovolemia in isoflurane-anesthetized pigs.

ANIMALS 6 healthy male Landrace pigs.

PROCEDURES Pigs were anesthetized with isoflurane, positioned in dorsal recumbency, and instrumented. Following induction of a neuromuscular blockade, pigs were mechanically ventilated throughout 5 sequential experimental stages during which the blood volume was manipulated so that subjects transitioned from normovolemia (baseline) to hypovolemia (blood volume depletion, 20% and 40%), back to normovolemia, and then to hypervolemia. During each stage, hemodynamic variables were measured before and 3 minutes after a PLRM and 1 minute after the pelvic limbs were returned to their original position. The PLRM consisted of raising the pelvic limbs and caudal portion of the abdomen to a 15° angle relative to the horizontal plane.

RESULTS Hemodynamic variables did not vary in response to the PLRM when pigs were normovolemic or hypervolemic. When pigs were hypovolemic, the PLRM resulted in a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease in plethysomographic variability index and pulse pressure variation. When the pelvic limbs were returned to their original position, cardiac output and pulse pressure variation rapidly returned to their pre-PLRM values, but the plethysomographic variability index did not.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested a modified PLRM might be useful for identification of hemodynamically unstable animals that are likely to respond to fluid therapy. Further research is necessary to validate the described PLRM for prediction of fluid responsiveness in clinically ill animals.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Paranjape (vparanjape24@gmail.com).