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Validation of a human angiopoietin-2 ELISA for measurement of angiopoietin-2 concentrations in canine plasma samples and supernatant of primary canine aortic endothelial cell cultures

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  • 1 Division of Small Animal Internal Medicine, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 2 Division of Small Animal Internal Medicine, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 3 Division of Clinic Research Medicine, Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 4 Division of Clinic Research Medicine, Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
  • | 5 Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 6 Section of Medical Genetics, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 7 Division of Small Animal Internal Medicine, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess 2 human ELISA kits for measurement of angiopoietin-1 and -2 concentrations in canine plasma samples, determine whether plasma angiopoeitin-2 concentration differed between septic and healthy dogs, and determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation on angiopoeitin-2 release from primary canine aortic endothelial cells (pCAECs) in vitro.

ANIMALS 10 healthy dogs and 10 septic dogs.

PROCEDURES Human angiopoietin-1 and -2 ELISAs were used to detect recombinant canine angiopoietins-1 and -2 in canine plasma samples. The angiopoietin-2 ELISA was further validated by use of plasma samples from healthy and septic dogs and supernatants of pCAEC cultures. Associations between plasma angiopoeitin-2 and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations were examined.

RESULTS Angiopoeitin-2 but not angiopoeitin-1 was detected in canine plasma samples by the respective ELISAs. The angiopoeitin-2 ELISA had excellent dilutional linearity, parallelism, accuracy, precision, and reproducibility for measurements in canine plasma samples and pCAEC supernatants. Plasma angiopoeitin-2 concentration was significantly higher in septic dogs (median, 25.5 ng/mL) than in healthy dogs (median, 6.7 ng/mL) and was positively correlated with plasma CRP concentration (R2 = 0.60). Stimulation of pCAECs with TNF-α resulted in a significant increase in supernatant angiopoietin-2 concentration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The tested human angiopoietin-2 ELISA kit was useful for measuring angiopoietin-2 concentrations in canine plasma samples and pCAEC supernatants. Sepsis appeared to increase angiopoietin-2 concentration in dogs in vivo, whereas TNF-α stimulation caused release of angiopoietin-2 from pCAECs in vitro. These findings support the use of angiopoietin-2 as a marker of endothelial cell activation and inflammation in dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess 2 human ELISA kits for measurement of angiopoietin-1 and -2 concentrations in canine plasma samples, determine whether plasma angiopoeitin-2 concentration differed between septic and healthy dogs, and determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation on angiopoeitin-2 release from primary canine aortic endothelial cells (pCAECs) in vitro.

ANIMALS 10 healthy dogs and 10 septic dogs.

PROCEDURES Human angiopoietin-1 and -2 ELISAs were used to detect recombinant canine angiopoietins-1 and -2 in canine plasma samples. The angiopoietin-2 ELISA was further validated by use of plasma samples from healthy and septic dogs and supernatants of pCAEC cultures. Associations between plasma angiopoeitin-2 and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations were examined.

RESULTS Angiopoeitin-2 but not angiopoeitin-1 was detected in canine plasma samples by the respective ELISAs. The angiopoeitin-2 ELISA had excellent dilutional linearity, parallelism, accuracy, precision, and reproducibility for measurements in canine plasma samples and pCAEC supernatants. Plasma angiopoeitin-2 concentration was significantly higher in septic dogs (median, 25.5 ng/mL) than in healthy dogs (median, 6.7 ng/mL) and was positively correlated with plasma CRP concentration (R2 = 0.60). Stimulation of pCAECs with TNF-α resulted in a significant increase in supernatant angiopoietin-2 concentration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The tested human angiopoietin-2 ELISA kit was useful for measuring angiopoietin-2 concentrations in canine plasma samples and pCAEC supernatants. Sepsis appeared to increase angiopoietin-2 concentration in dogs in vivo, whereas TNF-α stimulation caused release of angiopoietin-2 from pCAECs in vitro. These findings support the use of angiopoietin-2 as a marker of endothelial cell activation and inflammation in dogs.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Appendix S1 (PDF 152 kb)
    • Supplementary Figure S1 (PDF 151 kb)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 134 kb)
    • Supplementary Table S2 (PDF 156 kb)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Schuller (simone.schuller@vetsuisse.unibe.ch).