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Plasma concentrations of lidocaine following laryngeal administration or laryngeal and intratesticular administration in cats

Hamzeh Soltaninejad DVM1 and Nasser Vesal DVM, MVSc2
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran, 71441-69155.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran, 71441-69155.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine plasma concentrations of lidocaine after laryngeal administration or laryngeal and intratesticular administration in cats.

ANIMALS 14 healthy adult sexually intact male cats (7 cats/treatment).

PROCEDURES Cats were randomly allocated to receive 0.1 mL of 2% or 10% lidocaine hydrochloride solution (treatments L2 and L10, respectively) sprayed on the larynx for laryngeal desensitization, followed by endotracheal intubation and isoflurane anesthesia. After a 7-day washout period, cats were again randomly allocated to receive treatment L2 or L10, and castration was performed under isoflurane anesthesia following intratesticular administration of 2% lidocaine solution (0.1 mL/kg). In both experiments, a blood sample for measurement of plasma lidocaine concentration was obtained before (0 minutes) and 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, and 75 minutes after laryngeal administration of lidocaine solution. Anesthesia was discontinued at 60 minutes. Plasma lidocaine concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS After treatments L2 and L10, median maximum plasma lidocaine concentrations were 34.1 ng/mL (range, 0 to 279.4 ng/mL) and 93.6 ng/mL (range, 79.3 to 182.2 ng/mL), respectively. Time to maximum plasma concentration was 10 minutes (range, 0 to 20 minutes) for each treatment. When cats received intratesticular lidocaine administration following L2 or L10 treatment, median maximum plasma concentration was 181.0 ng/mL (range, 103.7 to 600.2 ng/mL) and 301.2 ng/mL (range, 265.8 to 1,770.0 ng/mL), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE On the basis of these data, combined laryngeal and intratesticular administration of lidocaine solution at a total dose of approximately 5 mg/kg appears to be safe for use in healthy adult cats.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine plasma concentrations of lidocaine after laryngeal administration or laryngeal and intratesticular administration in cats.

ANIMALS 14 healthy adult sexually intact male cats (7 cats/treatment).

PROCEDURES Cats were randomly allocated to receive 0.1 mL of 2% or 10% lidocaine hydrochloride solution (treatments L2 and L10, respectively) sprayed on the larynx for laryngeal desensitization, followed by endotracheal intubation and isoflurane anesthesia. After a 7-day washout period, cats were again randomly allocated to receive treatment L2 or L10, and castration was performed under isoflurane anesthesia following intratesticular administration of 2% lidocaine solution (0.1 mL/kg). In both experiments, a blood sample for measurement of plasma lidocaine concentration was obtained before (0 minutes) and 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, and 75 minutes after laryngeal administration of lidocaine solution. Anesthesia was discontinued at 60 minutes. Plasma lidocaine concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS After treatments L2 and L10, median maximum plasma lidocaine concentrations were 34.1 ng/mL (range, 0 to 279.4 ng/mL) and 93.6 ng/mL (range, 79.3 to 182.2 ng/mL), respectively. Time to maximum plasma concentration was 10 minutes (range, 0 to 20 minutes) for each treatment. When cats received intratesticular lidocaine administration following L2 or L10 treatment, median maximum plasma concentration was 181.0 ng/mL (range, 103.7 to 600.2 ng/mL) and 301.2 ng/mL (range, 265.8 to 1,770.0 ng/mL), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE On the basis of these data, combined laryngeal and intratesticular administration of lidocaine solution at a total dose of approximately 5 mg/kg appears to be safe for use in healthy adult cats.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Vesal (nv1340@shirazu.ac.ir).