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Comparison of angiographic dyes and injection techniques for ocular anterior segment angiography in horses

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess and compare 2 injection techniques for conducting ocular anterior segment indocyanine green angiography (ASICGA) and sodium fluorescein (SF) angiography in horses.

ANIMALS 3 healthy adult female horses (age range, 19 to 25 years).

PROCEDURES Horses were sedated, jugular catheters were placed, and manual restraint was used to ensure proper positioning for the angiography procedure. Two injection techniques (IV and intra-arterial) were performed for each horse 1 week apart. Intravenous injections of 0.25% indocyanine green (ICG; 50 mg) and 10% SF (10 mg/kg) were administered via the jugular catheter. Intra-arterial injections of ICG (1 mg) and SF (1 mg/kg) were administered into the common carotid artery with ultrasound guidance. Angiography was performed by use of an adaptor system comprised of a modified digital single-lens reflex camera, camera adaptor, and lens. Imaging was performed at a rate of 3 images/s for 60 seconds immediately following ICG injection, then at 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes after injection. The SF was injected 5 minutes thereafter.

RESULTS ASICGA allowed visual identification of the arterial, capillary, and venous phases of angiography. Intra-arterial administration provided superior dye fluorescence, sharper contrast, and faster dye passage than IV administration. Visibility of the iris vasculature was limited with SF, and extravasation of SF was noted. No clinically important adverse events were detected.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE ASICGA images were obtainable with both injection techniques; however, visibility of the iris vasculature was better with intra-arterial administration of ICG. The ASICGA technique may serve as a viable ocular imaging modality for horses.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess and compare 2 injection techniques for conducting ocular anterior segment indocyanine green angiography (ASICGA) and sodium fluorescein (SF) angiography in horses.

ANIMALS 3 healthy adult female horses (age range, 19 to 25 years).

PROCEDURES Horses were sedated, jugular catheters were placed, and manual restraint was used to ensure proper positioning for the angiography procedure. Two injection techniques (IV and intra-arterial) were performed for each horse 1 week apart. Intravenous injections of 0.25% indocyanine green (ICG; 50 mg) and 10% SF (10 mg/kg) were administered via the jugular catheter. Intra-arterial injections of ICG (1 mg) and SF (1 mg/kg) were administered into the common carotid artery with ultrasound guidance. Angiography was performed by use of an adaptor system comprised of a modified digital single-lens reflex camera, camera adaptor, and lens. Imaging was performed at a rate of 3 images/s for 60 seconds immediately following ICG injection, then at 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes after injection. The SF was injected 5 minutes thereafter.

RESULTS ASICGA allowed visual identification of the arterial, capillary, and venous phases of angiography. Intra-arterial administration provided superior dye fluorescence, sharper contrast, and faster dye passage than IV administration. Visibility of the iris vasculature was limited with SF, and extravasation of SF was noted. No clinically important adverse events were detected.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE ASICGA images were obtainable with both injection techniques; however, visibility of the iris vasculature was better with intra-arterial administration of ICG. The ASICGA technique may serve as a viable ocular imaging modality for horses.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Pirie's present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Address correspondence to Dr. Pirie (piriechr@cvm.msu.edu).