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Effect of oral administration of robenacoxib on inhibition of paracentesis-induced blood-aqueous barrier breakdown in healthy cats

Emily K. Sharpe DVM1, Jessica M. Meekins DVM, MS2, James K. Roush DVM, MS3, Amy J. Rankin DVM, MS4, and Butch KuKanich PhD, DVM5,6
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 5 Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 6 Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of oral administration of robenacoxib on inhibition of anterior chamber paracentesis (ACP)-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) and assess whether robenacoxib can cross an intact BAB in healthy cats.

ANIMALS 12 healthy adult domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES Cats received robenacoxib (6-mg tablet in a treat, PO; n = 6) or a control treatment (treat without any drug, PO; 6) once daily for 3 days, beginning 1 day before ACP. One eye of each cat served as an untreated control, whereas the other underwent ACP, during which a 30-gauge needle was used to aspirate 100 μL of aqueous humor for determination of robenacoxib concentration. Both eyes of each cat underwent anterior chamber fluorophotometry at 0 (immediately before), 6, 24, and 48 hours after ACP. Fluorescein concentration and percentage fluorescein increase were used to assess extent of ACP-induced BAB breakdown and compared between cats that did and did not receive robenacoxib.

RESULTS Extent of BAB breakdown induced by ACP did not differ significantly between cats that did and did not receive robenacoxib. Low concentrations of robenacoxib were detected in the aqueous humor (mean, 5.32 ng/mL; range, 0.9 to 16 ng/mL) for 5 of the 6 cats that received the drug.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that oral administration of robenacoxib did not significantly decrease extent of BAB breakdown in healthy cats. Detection of low robenacoxib concentrations in the aqueous humor for most treated cats indicated that the drug can cross an intact BAB.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of oral administration of robenacoxib on inhibition of anterior chamber paracentesis (ACP)-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) and assess whether robenacoxib can cross an intact BAB in healthy cats.

ANIMALS 12 healthy adult domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES Cats received robenacoxib (6-mg tablet in a treat, PO; n = 6) or a control treatment (treat without any drug, PO; 6) once daily for 3 days, beginning 1 day before ACP. One eye of each cat served as an untreated control, whereas the other underwent ACP, during which a 30-gauge needle was used to aspirate 100 μL of aqueous humor for determination of robenacoxib concentration. Both eyes of each cat underwent anterior chamber fluorophotometry at 0 (immediately before), 6, 24, and 48 hours after ACP. Fluorescein concentration and percentage fluorescein increase were used to assess extent of ACP-induced BAB breakdown and compared between cats that did and did not receive robenacoxib.

RESULTS Extent of BAB breakdown induced by ACP did not differ significantly between cats that did and did not receive robenacoxib. Low concentrations of robenacoxib were detected in the aqueous humor (mean, 5.32 ng/mL; range, 0.9 to 16 ng/mL) for 5 of the 6 cats that received the drug.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that oral administration of robenacoxib did not significantly decrease extent of BAB breakdown in healthy cats. Detection of low robenacoxib concentrations in the aqueous humor for most treated cats indicated that the drug can cross an intact BAB.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Sharpe's present address is Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Address correspondence to Dr. Meekins (jslack@vet.k-state.edu).