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Use of proteomic analysis to determine the protein constituents of synovial fluid samples from the stifle joints of dogs with and without osteoarthritis secondary to cranial cruciate ligament rupture

Muhammad Shahid DVM, MPhil1, George Manchi DVM, Dr Med Vet2, Leo Brunnberg DVM, Dr Med Vet Habil3, and Jens Raila DVM, Dr Med Vet Habil4
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  • 1 Small Animal Clinic, Freie Universität Berlin, D-14163 Berlin, Germany.
  • | 2 Small Animal Clinic, Freie Universität Berlin, D-14163 Berlin, Germany.
  • | 3 Small Animal Clinic, Freie Universität Berlin, D-14163 Berlin, Germany.
  • | 4 Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam 114-116, D-14558 Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To use proteomic analysis to determine the protein constituents of synovial fluid samples from the stifle joints of dogs with and without osteoarthritis secondary to cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR).

ANIMALS 12 dogs with clinically normal stifle joints (controls) and 16 dogs with osteoarthritis secondary to CCLR.

PROCEDURES A synovial fluid sample was obtained from all dogs. Synovial fluid total protein concentration was determined by the Bradford assay. Proteins were separated by use of a 1-D SDS-PAGE to detect protein bands that differed between dogs with and without osteoarthritis. Those protein bands then underwent trypsin digestion and were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the results of which were compared with a curated protein sequence database for protein identification. One of the most frequently identified proteins, apoprotein (apo) A-I, was then quantified in all synovial fluid samples by use of a competitive-inhibition ELISA. Results were compared between dogs with and without osteoarthritis.

RESULTS Median synovial fluid total protein and apo A-I concentrations for dogs with osteoarthritis were significantly greater than those for control dogs. The most abundant proteins identified in the synovial fluid were albumin and apo A-I.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that quantification of synovial fluid total protein and apo A-I concentrations might facilitate diagnosis of osteoarthritis secondary to CCLR in dogs. Further research and validation of synovial fluid apo A-I concentration as a biomarker for osteoarthritis in dogs are necessary before it can be recommended for clinical use.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To use proteomic analysis to determine the protein constituents of synovial fluid samples from the stifle joints of dogs with and without osteoarthritis secondary to cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR).

ANIMALS 12 dogs with clinically normal stifle joints (controls) and 16 dogs with osteoarthritis secondary to CCLR.

PROCEDURES A synovial fluid sample was obtained from all dogs. Synovial fluid total protein concentration was determined by the Bradford assay. Proteins were separated by use of a 1-D SDS-PAGE to detect protein bands that differed between dogs with and without osteoarthritis. Those protein bands then underwent trypsin digestion and were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the results of which were compared with a curated protein sequence database for protein identification. One of the most frequently identified proteins, apoprotein (apo) A-I, was then quantified in all synovial fluid samples by use of a competitive-inhibition ELISA. Results were compared between dogs with and without osteoarthritis.

RESULTS Median synovial fluid total protein and apo A-I concentrations for dogs with osteoarthritis were significantly greater than those for control dogs. The most abundant proteins identified in the synovial fluid were albumin and apo A-I.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that quantification of synovial fluid total protein and apo A-I concentrations might facilitate diagnosis of osteoarthritis secondary to CCLR in dogs. Further research and validation of synovial fluid apo A-I concentration as a biomarker for osteoarthritis in dogs are necessary before it can be recommended for clinical use.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Raila (jens.raila@uni-potsdam.de).